Openly accessible

Woodland birds and rural towns: artificial clutch survival in fragmented Box-Ironbark forests

Meney, B, Cunningham, S, Weston, MA and Whisson, DA 2018, Woodland birds and rural towns: artificial clutch survival in fragmented Box-Ironbark forests, Proceedings of the Royal Society of Victoria, vol. 130, no. 1, pp. 7-17, doi: 10.1071/RS18001.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
weston-woodlandbirds-2018.pdf Published version application/pdf 1.65MB 2

Title Woodland birds and rural towns: artificial clutch survival in fragmented Box-Ironbark forests
Author(s) Meney, B
Cunningham, S
Weston, MAORCID iD for Weston, MA orcid.org/0000-0002-8717-0410
Whisson, DAORCID iD for Whisson, DA orcid.org/0000-0002-4221-0706
Journal name Proceedings of the Royal Society of Victoria
Volume number 130
Issue number 1
Start page 7
End page 17
Total pages 11
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Place of publication Clayton, Vic.
Publication date 2018
ISSN 0035-9211
Keyword(s) artificial nests
box-ironbark forest
clutch loss
egg predators
nest loss
reproduction
woodland birds
Summary Woodland birds are declining throughout the agricultural landscapes of south-eastern Australia, but the specific mechanisms driving these declines remain unclear. Reproductive failure via clutch depredation could conceivably contribute to these declines. Although site-scale habitat may influence the risk of clutch failure, larger-scale influences, such as whether a landscape contains a rural town or not (‘landscape type’), may also play a role. This study monitored artificial open-cup nests deployed in three pairs of the two landscape types and: 1) indexed clutch survival and predator assemblage; and 2) determined if clutch survival was influenced by landscape type and/or local habitat characteristics. High levels of clutch depredation were observed in both landscape types and for all landscapes, with no evidence to suggest that landscape type or habitat characteristics influenced clutch survival or the time-to-first-predator visit. Predator assemblage also was consistent between landscape types. Generalist avian predators were the most common egg predators. Such egg predators may be ubiquitous throughout the fragmented Box-Ironbark woodlands of south-eastern Australia.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/RS18001
Field of Research 050104 Landscape Ecology
MD Multidisciplinary
Socio Economic Objective 960806 Forest and Woodlands Flora
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, Royal Society of Victoria
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30112487

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 17 Abstract Views, 4 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2018, 11:13:05 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.