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Differential localization and anabolic responsiveness of mTOR complexes in human skeletal muscle in response to feeding and exercise

Hodson, Nathan, McGlory, Chris, Oikawa, Sara Y., Jeromson, Stewart, Song, Zhe, Rüegg, Markus A., Hamilton, D. Lee, Phillips, Stuart M. and Philp, Andrew 2017, Differential localization and anabolic responsiveness of mTOR complexes in human skeletal muscle in response to feeding and exercise, American journal of physiology. Cell physiology, vol. 313, no. 6, pp. C604-C611, doi: 10.1152/ajpcell.00176.2017.

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Title Differential localization and anabolic responsiveness of mTOR complexes in human skeletal muscle in response to feeding and exercise
Author(s) Hodson, Nathan
McGlory, Chris
Oikawa, Sara Y.
Jeromson, Stewart
Song, Zhe
Rüegg, Markus A.
Hamilton, D. Lee
Phillips, Stuart M.
Philp, Andrew
Journal name American journal of physiology. Cell physiology
Volume number 313
Issue number 6
Start page C604
End page C611
Total pages 8
Publisher American Physiological Society
Place of publication Bethesda, Md.
Publication date 2017-12
ISSN 0363-6143
1522-1563
Keyword(s) Raptor
Rictor
lysosome
mTORC1
mTORC2
Adult
Dietary Carbohydrates
Dietary Proteins
Eating
Energy Metabolism
Exercise
Humans
Lysosomal-Associated Membrane Protein 2
Lysosomes
Male
Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1
Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 2
Muscle Contraction
Protein Transport
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt
Quadriceps Muscle
Rapamycin-Insensitive Companion of mTOR Protein
Regulatory-Associated Protein of mTOR
Resistance Training
Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinases, 70-kDa
Sarcolemma
Time Factors
Young Adult
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Cell Biology
Physiology
PROTEIN-SYNTHESIS
AMINO-ACIDS
RESISTANCE EXERCISE
RAPAMYCIN
PHOSPHORYLATION
ACTIVATION
INCREASE
TARGET
Summary Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) resides as two complexes within skeletal muscle. mTOR complex 1 [mTORC1-regulatory associated protein of mTOR (Raptor) positive] regulates skeletal muscle growth, whereas mTORC2 [rapamycin-insensitive companion of mTOR (Rictor) positive] regulates insulin sensitivity. To examine the regulation of these complexes in human skeletal muscle, we utilized immunohistochemical analysis to study the localization of mTOR complexes before and following protein-carbohydrate feeding (FED) and resistance exercise plus protein-carbohydrate feeding (EXFED) in a unilateral exercise model. In basal samples, mTOR and the lysosomal marker lysosomal associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP2) were highly colocalized and remained so throughout. In the FED and EXFED states, mTOR/LAMP2 complexes were redistributed to the cell periphery [wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-positive staining] (time effect; P = 0.025), with 39% (FED) and 26% (EXFED) increases in mTOR/WGA association observed 1 h post-feeding/exercise. mTOR/WGA colocalization continued to increase in EXFED at 3 h (48% above baseline) whereas colocalization decreased in FED (21% above baseline). A significant effect of condition (P = 0.05) was noted suggesting mTOR/WGA colocalization was greater during EXFED. This pattern was replicated in Raptor/WGA association, where a significant difference between EXFED and FED was noted at 3 h post-exercise/feeding (P = 0.014). Rictor/WGA colocalization remained unaltered throughout the trial. Alterations in mTORC1 cellular location coincided with elevated S6K1 kinase activity, which rose to a greater extent in EXFED compared with FED at 1 h post-exercise/feeding (P < 0.001), and only remained elevated in EXFED at the 3 h time point (P = 0.037). Collectively these data suggest that mTORC1 redistribution within the cell is a fundamental response to resistance exercise and feeding, whereas mTORC2 is predominantly situated at the sarcolemma and does not alter localization.
Language eng
DOI 10.1152/ajpcell.00176.2017
Field of Research 0601 Biochemistry And Cell Biology
0606 Physiology
1116 Medical Physiology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2017, American Physiological Society
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30112696

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.