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Resistance exercise initiates mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) translocation and protein complex co-localisation in human skeletal muscle

Song, Zhe, Moore, Daniel R, Hodson, Nathan, Ward, Carl, Dent, Jessica R, O'Leary, Mary F, Shaw, Andrew M, Hamilton, D. Lee, Sarkar, Sovan, Gangloff, Yann-Gaël, Hornberger, Troy A, Spriet, Lawrence L, Heigenhauser, George J and Philp, Andrew 2017, Resistance exercise initiates mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) translocation and protein complex co-localisation in human skeletal muscle, Scientific reports, vol. 7, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-05483-x.

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Title Resistance exercise initiates mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) translocation and protein complex co-localisation in human skeletal muscle
Author(s) Song, Zhe
Moore, Daniel R
Hodson, Nathan
Ward, Carl
Dent, Jessica R
O'Leary, Mary F
Shaw, Andrew M
Hamilton, D. Lee
Sarkar, Sovan
Gangloff, Yann-Gaël
Hornberger, Troy A
Spriet, Lawrence L
Heigenhauser, George J
Philp, Andrew
Journal name Scientific reports
Volume number 7
Article ID 5028
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-07-10
ISSN 2045-2322
Keyword(s) cell biology
TOR signalling
resistance
rapamycin (mTOR)
human skeletal muscle
protein synthesis
immunofluorescence
mTOR cellular distribution
protein-protein co-localisation
science & technology
Summary The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central mediator of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle. We utilized immunofluorescence approaches to study mTOR cellular distribution and protein-protein co-localisation in human skeletal muscle in the basal state as well as immediately, 1 and 3 h after an acute bout of resistance exercise in a fed (FED; 20 g Protein/40 g carbohydrate/1 g fat) or energy-free control (CON) state. mTOR and the lysosomal protein LAMP2 were highly co-localised in basal samples. Resistance exercise resulted in rapid translocation of mTOR/LAMP2 towards the cell membrane. Concurrently, resistance exercise led to the dissociation of TSC2 from Rheb and increased in the co-localisation of mTOR and Rheb post exercise in both FED and CON. In addition, mTOR co-localised with Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit F (eIF3F) at the cell membrane post-exercise in both groups, with the response significantly greater at 1 h of recovery in the FED compared to CON. Collectively our data demonstrate that cellular trafficking of mTOR occurs in human muscle in response to an anabolic stimulus, events that appear to be primarily influenced by muscle contraction. The translocation and association of mTOR with positive regulators (i.e. Rheb and eIF3F) is consistent with an enhanced mRNA translational capacity after resistance exercise.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-05483-x
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30112703

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.