Digital characteristics and dissemination indicators to optimize delivery of internet-supported mindfulness-based interventions for people with a chronic condition: systematic review

Russell, Lahiru, Ugalde, Anna, Milne, Donna, Austin, David and Livingston, Patricia M. 2018, Digital characteristics and dissemination indicators to optimize delivery of internet-supported mindfulness-based interventions for people with a chronic condition: systematic review, JMIR mental health, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 1-16, doi: 10.2196/mental.9645.

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Title Digital characteristics and dissemination indicators to optimize delivery of internet-supported mindfulness-based interventions for people with a chronic condition: systematic review
Author(s) Russell, Lahiru
Ugalde, AnnaORCID iD for Ugalde, Anna orcid.org/0000-0002-2473-8435
Milne, Donna
Austin, DavidORCID iD for Austin, David orcid.org/0000-0002-1296-3555
Livingston, Patricia M.ORCID iD for Livingston, Patricia M. orcid.org/0000-0001-6616-3839
Journal name JMIR mental health
Volume number 5
Issue number 3
Article ID e53
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Publisher JMIR publications
Place of publication Toronto, Ontario
Publication date 2018-08-21
ISSN 2368-7959
Keyword(s) chronic condition
internet
mindfulness
Summary BACKGROUND: Internet-supported mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) are increasingly being used to support people with a chronic condition. Characteristics of MBIs vary greatly in their mode of delivery, communication patterns, level of facilitator involvement, intervention period, and resource intensity, making it difficult to compare how individual digital features may optimize intervention adherence and outcomes. OBJECTIVE: The aims of this review were to (1) provide a description of digital characteristics of internet-supported MBIs and examine how these relate to evidence for efficacy and adherence to the intervention and (2) gain insights into the type of information available to inform translation of internet-supported MBIs to applied settings. METHODS: MEDLINE Complete, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases were searched for studies assessing an MBI delivered or accessed via the internet and engaging participants in daily mindfulness-based activities such as mindfulness meditations and informal mindfulness practices. Only studies using a comparison group of alternative interventions (active compactor), usual care, or wait-list were included. Given the broad definition of chronic conditions, specific conditions were not included in the original search to maximize results. The search resulted in 958 articles, from which 11 articles describing 10 interventions met the inclusion criteria. RESULTS: Internet-supported MBIs were more effective than usual care or wait-list groups, and self-guided interventions were as effective as facilitator-guided interventions. Findings were informed mainly by female participants. Adherence to interventions was inconsistently defined and prevented robust comparison between studies. Reporting of factors associated with intervention dissemination, such as population representativeness, program adoption and maintenance, and costs, was rare. CONCLUSIONS: More comprehensive descriptions of digital characteristics need to be reported to further our understanding of features that may influence engagement and behavior change and to improve the reproducibility of MBIs. Gender differences in determinants and patterns of health behavior should be taken into account at the intervention design stage to accommodate male and female preferences. Future research could compare MBIs with established evidence-based therapies to identify the population groups that would benefit most from internet-supported programs. 
Language eng
DOI 10.2196/mental.9645
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, Lahiru Russell, Anna Ugalde, Donna Milne, David Austin, Patricia M Livingston.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30112712

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research
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