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Low incidence of recurrent Buruli ulcers in treated Australian patients living in an endemic region

Wynne, James W., Stinear, Timothy P., Athan, Eugene, Michalski, Wojtek P. and O'Brien, Daniel P. 2018, Low incidence of recurrent Buruli ulcers in treated Australian patients living in an endemic region, PLoS neglected tropical diseases, vol. 12, no. 8, doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0006724.

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Title Low incidence of recurrent Buruli ulcers in treated Australian patients living in an endemic region
Author(s) Wynne, James W.
Stinear, Timothy P.
Athan, EugeneORCID iD for Athan, Eugene orcid.org/0000-0001-9838-6471
Michalski, Wojtek P.
O'Brien, Daniel P.
Journal name PLoS neglected tropical diseases
Volume number 12
Issue number 8
Article ID e0006724
Total pages 10
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2018-08
ISSN 1935-2727
1935-2735
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Infectious Diseases
Parasitology
Tropical Medicine
MYCOBACTERIUM-ULCERANS
DISEASE
INFECTION
THERAPY
COHORT
GENOME
RISK
Summary We examined recurrent Buruli ulcer cases following treatment and assumed cure in a large cohort of Australian patients living in an endemic area. We report that while the recurrence rate was low (2.81 cases/year/1000 population), it remained similar to the estimated risk of primary infection within the general population of the endemic area (0.85-4.04 cases/year/1,000 population). The majority of recurrent lesions occurred in different regions of the body and were separated by a median time interval of 44 months. Clinical, treatment and epidemiological factors combined with whole genome sequencing of primary and recurrent isolates suggests that in most recurrent cases a re-infection was more likely as opposed to a relapse of the initial infection. Additionally, all cases occurring more than 12 months after commencement of treatment were likely re-infections. Our study provides important prognostic information for patients and their health care providers concerning the nature and risks associated with recurrent cases of Buruli ulcer in Australia.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pntd.0006724
Field of Research 06 Biological Sciences
11 Medical And Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, Wynne et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30112722

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.