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Direct coupling of a free-flow isotachophoresis (FFITP) device with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS)

Park, J. K., Campos, C. D. M., Neužil, P., Abelmann, L., Guijt, R. M. and Manz, A. 2015, Direct coupling of a free-flow isotachophoresis (FFITP) device with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), Lab on a chip, vol. 15, no. 17, pp. 3495-3502, doi: 10.1039/c5lc00523j.

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Title Direct coupling of a free-flow isotachophoresis (FFITP) device with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS)
Author(s) Park, J. K.
Campos, C. D. M.
Neužil, P.
Abelmann, L.
Guijt, R. M.ORCID iD for Guijt, R. M. orcid.org/0000-0003-0011-5708
Manz, A.
Journal name Lab on a chip
Volume number 15
Issue number 17
Start page 3495
End page 3502
Total pages 8
Publisher Royal Society of Chemistry
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2015-09-07
ISSN 1473-0197
1473-0189
Keyword(s) citric acid
equipment design
fluorescein
isotachophoresis
lab-on-a-chip devices
models, chemical
spectrometry, mass, electrospray ionization
science & technology
life sciences & biomedicine
physical sciences
biochemical research methods
chemistry, multidisciplinary
chemistry, analytical
nanoscience & nanotechnology
biochemistry & molecular biology
chemistry
Summary We present the online coupling of a free-flow isotachophoresis (FFITP) device to an electrospray ionization mass spectrometer (ESI-MS) for continuous analysis without extensive sample preparation. Free-flow-electrophoresis techniques are used for continuous electrophoretic separations using an electric field applied perpendicular to the buffer and sample flow, with FFITP using a discontinuous electrolyte system to concurrently focus a target analyte and remove interferences. The online coupling of FFITP to ESI-MS decouples the separation and detection timeframe because the electrophoretic separation takes place perpendicular to the flow direction, which can be beneficial for monitoring (bio)chemical changes and/or extensive MSn studies. We demonstrated the coupling of FFITP with ESI-MS for simultaneous concentration of target analytes and sample clean-up. Furthermore, we show hydrodynamic control of the fluidic fraction injected into the MS, allowing for fluidically controlled scanning of the ITP window. Future applications of this approach are expected in monitoring biochemical changes and proteomics.
Language eng
DOI 10.1039/c5lc00523j
Field of Research 03 Chemical Sciences
09 Engineering
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Royal Society of Chemistry
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30112924

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.