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Scale-dependent community theory for streams and other linear habitats

Holt, Galen and Chesson, Peter 2016, Scale-dependent community theory for streams and other linear habitats, American naturalist, vol. 188, no. 3, pp. E59-E73, doi: 10.1086/687525.

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Title Scale-dependent community theory for streams and other linear habitats
Author(s) Holt, GalenORCID iD for Holt, Galen orcid.org/0000-0002-7455-9275
Chesson, Peter
Journal name American naturalist
Volume number 188
Issue number 3
Start page E59
End page E73
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Place of publication Chicago, Ill.
Publication date 2016-09
ISSN 0003-0147
1537-5323
Keyword(s) coexistence
directional dispersal
environmental and dispersal scale
fitness-density covariance
spatial storage effect
stream communities
Animal Distribution
Animals
Biodiversity
Ecosystem
Models, Theoretical
Population Dynamics
Rivers
Spatio-Temporal Analysis
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Ecology
Evolutionary Biology
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
ADVECTION-DOMINATED SYSTEMS
ENVIRONMENTAL VARIABILITY
SPECIES TRAITS
COEXISTENCE MECHANISMS
SPATIAL HETEROGENEITY
ECOLOGICAL COMMUNITY
VARYING ENVIRONMENTS
POPULATION-DYNAMICS
DENDRITIC NETWORKS
REGIONAL PROCESSES
Summary The maintenance of species diversity occurs at the regional scale but depends on interacting processes at the full range of lower scales. Although there is a long history of study of regional diversity as an emergent property, analyses of fully multiscale dynamics are rare. Here, we use scale transition theory for a quantitative analysis of multiscale diversity maintenance with continuous scales of dispersal and environmental variation in space and time. We develop our analysis with a model of a linear habitat, applicable to streams or coastlines, to provide a theoretical foundation for the long-standing interest in environmental variation and dispersal, including downstream drift. We find that the strength of regional coexistence is strongest when local densities and local environmental conditions are strongly correlated. Increasing dispersal and shortening environmental correlations weaken the strength of coexistence regionally and shift the dominant coexistence mechanism from fitness-density covariance to the spatial storage effect, while increasing local diversity. Analysis of the physical and biological determinants of these mechanisms improves understanding of traditional concepts of environmental filters, mass effects, and species sorting. Our results highlight the limitations of the binary distinction between local communities and a species pool and emphasize species coexistence as a problem of multiple scales in space and time.
Language eng
DOI 10.1086/687525
Field of Research 06 Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2016, University of Chicago Press
Free to Read? Yes
Free to Read Start Date 2017-10-01
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30112959

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.