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Exposure to agricultural pesticide impairs visual lateralization in a larval coral reef fish

Besson, Marc, Gache, Camille, Bertucci, Frederic, Brooker, Rohan M., Roux, Natacha, Jacob, Hugo, Berthe, Cecile, Sovrano, Valeria Anna, Dixson, Danielle L. and Lecchini, David 2017, Exposure to agricultural pesticide impairs visual lateralization in a larval coral reef fish, Scientific reports, vol. 7, no. 1, doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-09381-0.

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Title Exposure to agricultural pesticide impairs visual lateralization in a larval coral reef fish
Author(s) Besson, Marc
Gache, Camille
Bertucci, Frederic
Brooker, Rohan M.ORCID iD for Brooker, Rohan M. orcid.org/0000-0001-8739-6914
Roux, Natacha
Jacob, Hugo
Berthe, Cecile
Sovrano, Valeria Anna
Dixson, Danielle L.
Lecchini, David
Journal name Scientific reports
Volume number 7
Issue number 1
Article ID 9165
Total pages 9
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-08-22
ISSN 2045-2322
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
GREAT-BARRIER-REEF
LEFT-RIGHT ASYMMETRY
BEHAVIORAL LATERALIZATION
FRENCH-POLYNESIA
BRAIN LATERALIZATION
SOCIAL-STIMULI
CLIMATE-CHANGE
EYE USE
HABITAT SELECTION
ZEBRAFISH LARVAE
Summary Lateralization, i.e. the preferential use of one side of the body, may convey fitness benefits for organisms within rapidly-changing environments, by optimizing separate and parallel processing of different information between the two brain hemispheres. In coral reef-fishes, the movement of larvae from planktonic to reef environments (recruitment) represents a major life-history transition. This transition requires larvae to rapidly identify and respond to sensory cues to select a suitable habitat that facilitates survival and growth. This 'recruitment' is critical for population persistence and resilience. In aquarium experiments, larval Acanthurus triostegus preferentially used their right-eye to investigate a variety of visual stimuli. Despite this, when held in in situ cages with predators, those larvae that previously favored their left-eye exhibited higher survival. These results support the "brain's right-hemisphere" theory, which predicts that the right-eye (i.e. left-hemisphere) is used to categorize stimuli while the left-eye (i.e. right-hemisphere) is used to inspect novel items and initiate rapid behavioral-responses. While these experiments confirm that being highly lateralized is ecologically advantageous, exposure to chlorpyrifos, a pesticide often inadvertently added to coral-reef waters, impaired visual-lateralization. This suggests that chemical pollutants could impair the brain function of larval fishes during a critical life-history transition, potentially impacting recruitment success.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-09381-0
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30113056

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.