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Coping with compliance during take-off and landing in the diamond dove (Geopelia cuneata)

Crandell, Kristen E., Smith, Austin F., Crino, Ondi L. and Tobalske, Bret W. 2018, Coping with compliance during take-off and landing in the diamond dove (Geopelia cuneata), PLOS One, vol. 13, no. 7, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0199662.

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Title Coping with compliance during take-off and landing in the diamond dove (Geopelia cuneata)
Author(s) Crandell, Kristen E.
Smith, Austin F.
Crino, Ondi L.
Tobalske, Bret W.
Journal name PLOS One
Volume number 13
Issue number 7
Article ID e0199662
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2018
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
JUMPING PERFORMANCE
ANOLIS-CAROLINENSIS
PERCH COMPLIANCE
KINEMATICS
LOCOMOTION
SUBSTRATE
MECHANICS
BEHAVIOR
LIZARDS
FLIGHT
Summary The natural world is filled with substrates of varying properties that challenge locomotor abilities. Birds appear to transition smoothly from aerial to terrestrial environments during take-offs and landings using substrates that are incredibly variable. It may be challenging to control movement on and off compliant (flexible) substrates such as twigs, yet birds routinely accomplish such tasks. Previous research suggests that birds do not use their legs to harness elastic recoil from perches. Given avian mastery of take-off and landing, we hypothesized that birds instead modulate wing, body and tail movements to effectively use compliant perches. We measured take-off and landing performance of diamond doves (Geopelia cuneata (N = 5) in the laboratory and perch selection in this species in the field (N = 25). Contrary to our hypothesis, doves do not control take-off and landing on compliant perches as effectively as they do on stiff perches. They do not recover elastic energy from the perch, and take-off velocities are thus negatively impacted. Landing velocities remain unchanged, which suggests they may not anticipate the need to compensate for compliance. Legs and wings function as independent units: legs produce lower initial velocities when taking off from a compliant substrate, which negatively impacts later flight velocities. During landing, significant stability problems arise with compliance that are ameliorated by the wings and tail. Collectively, we suggest that the diamond dove maintains a generalized take-off and landing behavior regardless of perch compliance, leading us to conclude that perch compliance represents a challenge for flying birds. Free-living diamond doves avoid the negative impacts of compliance by preferentially selecting perches of larger diameter, which tend to be stiffer.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0199662
Field of Research MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Grant ID National Science Foundation Grant #CMMI 1234737
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Public Domain Mark
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30113246

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.