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The ecological and life history correlates of boldness in free-ranging lizards

Ward-Fear, Georgia, Brown, Gregory P., Pearson, David J., West, Andrea, Rollins, Lee. and Shine, Richard 2018, The ecological and life history correlates of boldness in free-ranging lizards, Ecosphere, vol. 9, no. 3, doi: 10.1002/ecs2.2125.

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Title The ecological and life history correlates of boldness in free-ranging lizards
Author(s) Ward-Fear, Georgia
Brown, Gregory P.
Pearson, David J.
West, Andrea
Rollins, Lee.ORCID iD for Rollins, Lee. orcid.org/0000-0002-3279-7005
Shine, Richard
Journal name Ecosphere
Volume number 9
Issue number 3
Article ID e02125
Total pages 13
Publisher Ecological Society of America
Place of publication Hoboken, N.J.
Publication date 2018-03-01
ISSN 2150-8925
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Ecology
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
aggression
antipredator
behavioral syndrome
boldness
monitor lizard
neophobia
personality
reptile behavior
Varanus
wild population
BEHAVIORAL SYNDROMES
ANIMAL PERSONALITY
VARANID LIZARDS
ANTIPREDATOR BEHAVIOR
TROPICAL AUSTRALIA
POPULATION-LEVEL
EVOLUTION
TEMPERAMENT
TRANSLOCATION
CONSEQUENCES
Summary In many animal populations, individuals exhibit repeatable behavioral traits across a range of contexts, and similarly, individuals differ in ecological traits such as habitat use, home range sizes, growth rates, and mating success. However, links between an individual's positions on behavioral vs. ecological axes of variation remain relatively unstudied in the wild. In the course of fieldwork on a remote floodplain in tropical Australia, we quantified boldness and ecological traits in 86 free-ranging (radio-tracked) monitor lizards (Varanus panoptes). These large (up to 7 kg) lizards exhibited a spectrum of boldness, as reflected in correlated scores of responses to approach, handling, and novel prey. Bolder lizards had larger core home ranges and higher mating success and spent more time in areas of high predator abundance, and their seasonal regimes of predation-induced mortality differed from those of shyer lizards. Thus, behavioral differences among lizards underpin much of the variation in ecological traits and individual fitness within this population. Analyses of ecology and microevolution in natural populations cannot afford to ignore the complex covariation between behavior, ecology, and evolution in the wild.
Language eng
DOI 10.1002/ecs2.2125
Field of Research 0501 Ecological Applications
0602 Ecology
0608 Zoology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, Ward-Fear et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30113340

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.