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Quantification of axial abnormality due to cerebellar ataxia with inertial measurements

Nguyen, Nhan, Phan, Thi My Dung, Pathirana, Pubudu, Horne, Malcolm, Power, Laura and Szmulewicz, David 2018, Quantification of axial abnormality due to cerebellar ataxia with inertial measurements, Sensors, vol. 18, no. 9, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.3390/s18092791.

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Title Quantification of axial abnormality due to cerebellar ataxia with inertial measurements
Author(s) Nguyen, Nhan
Phan, Thi My Dung
Pathirana, PubuduORCID iD for Pathirana, Pubudu orcid.org/0000-0001-8014-7798
Horne, Malcolm
Power, Laura
Szmulewicz, David
Journal name Sensors
Volume number 18
Issue number 9
Article ID 2791
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2018-08-24
ISSN 1424-8220
Keyword(s) cerebellar ataxia
inertial measurement unit (IMU)
postural balance control
rehabilitation
Romberg test
trunk test
entropy measures
Summary Cerebellar Ataxia (CA) leads to deficiencies in muscle movement and lack of coordination that is often manifested as gait and balance disabilities. Conventional CA clinical assessments are subjective, cumbersome and provide less insight into the functional capabilities of patients. This cross-sectional study investigates the use of wearable inertial sensors strategically positioned on the front-chest and upper-back locations during the Romberg and Trunk tests for objective assessment of human postural balance due to CA. The primary aim of this paper is to quantify the performance of postural stability of 34 patients diagnosed with CA and 22 healthy subjects as controls. Several forms of entropy descriptions were considered to uncover characteristics of movements intrinsic to CA. Indeed, correlation with clinical observation is vital in ascertaining the validity of the inertial measurements in addition to capturing unique features of movements not typically observed by the practicing clinician. Both of these aspects form an integral part of the underlying objective assessment scheme. Uncertainty in the velocity contained a significant level of information with respect to truncal instability and, based on an extensive clustering and discrimination analysis, fuzzy entropy was identified as an effective measure in characterising the underlying disability. Front-chest measurements demonstrated a strong correlation with clinical assessments while the upper-back measurements performed better in classifying the two cohorts, inferring that the standard clinical assessments are relatively influenced by the frontal observations. The Romberg test was confirmed to be an effective test of neurological diagnosis as well as a potential candidate for objective assessment resulting in a significant correlation with the clinical assessments. In contrast, the Trunk test is observed to be relatively less informative.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/s18092791
Field of Research 0301 Analytical Chemistry
0906 Electrical And Electronic Engineering
Copyright notice ©2018, the authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30113378

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.