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Whole gut microbiome composition of damselfish and cardinalfish before and after reef settlement

Parris, Darren J, Brooker, Rohan M, Morgan, Michael A, Dixson, Danielle L and Stewart, Frank J 2016, Whole gut microbiome composition of damselfish and cardinalfish before and after reef settlement, PeerJ, vol. 4, pp. 1-23, doi: 10.7717/peerj.2412.

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Title Whole gut microbiome composition of damselfish and cardinalfish before and after reef settlement
Author(s) Parris, Darren J
Brooker, Rohan MORCID iD for Brooker, Rohan M orcid.org/0000-0001-8739-6914
Morgan, Michael A
Dixson, Danielle L
Stewart, Frank J
Journal name PeerJ
Volume number 4
Article ID e2412
Start page 1
End page 23
Total pages 23
Publisher PeerJ Inc.
Place of publication Corte Madera, Calif.
Publication date 2016-08-31
ISSN 2167-8359
Keyword(s) microbiome
fish
coral reef
community structure
Vibrio
Endozoicomonas
core diversity
science & technology
Summary The Pomacentridae (damselfish) and Apogonidae (cardinalfish) are among the most common fish families on coral reefs and in the aquarium trade. Members of both families undergo a pelagic larvae phase prior to settlement on the reef, where adults play key roles in benthic habitat structuring and trophic interactions. Fish-associated microbial communities (microbiomes) significantly influence fish health and ecology, yet little is known of how microbiomes change with life stage. We quantified the taxonomic (16S rRNA gene) composition of whole gut microbiomes from ten species of damselfish and two species of cardinalfish from Lizard Island, Australia, focusing specifically on comparisons between pelagic larvae prior to settlement on the reef versus post-settlement juvenile and adult individuals. On average, microbiome phylogenetic diversity increased from pre- to post-settlement, and was unrelated to the microbial composition in the surrounding water column. However, this trend varied among species, suggesting stochasticity in fish microbiome assembly. Pre-settlement fish were enriched with bacteria of the Endozoicomonaceae, Shewanellaceae, and Fusobacteriaceae, whereas settled fish harbored higher abundances of Vibrionaceae and Pasteurellaceae. Several individual operational taxonomic units, including ones related to Vibrio harveyi, Shewanella sp., and uncultured Endozoicomonas bacteria, were shared between both pre and post-settlement stages and may be of central importance in the intestinal niche across development. Richness of the core microbiome shared among pre-settlement fish was comparable to that of settled individuals, suggesting that changes in diversity with adulthood are due to the acquisition or loss of host-specific microbes. These results identify a key transition in microbiome structure across host life stage, suggesting changes in the functional contribution of microbiomes over development in two ecologically dominant reef fish families.
Language eng
DOI 10.7717/peerj.2412
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Parris et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30113401

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.