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Does the social context of early alcohol use affect risky drinking in adolescents? Prospective cohort study

Degenhardt, Louisa, Romaniuk, Helena, Coffey, Carolyn, Hall, Wayne D, Swift, Wendy, Carlin, John B, O'Loughlin, Christina and Patton, George C 2015, Does the social context of early alcohol use affect risky drinking in adolescents? Prospective cohort study, BMC public health, vol. 15, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1186/s12889-015-2443-5.

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Title Does the social context of early alcohol use affect risky drinking in adolescents? Prospective cohort study
Author(s) Degenhardt, Louisa
Romaniuk, Helena
Coffey, Carolyn
Hall, Wayne D
Swift, Wendy
Carlin, John B
O'Loughlin, Christina
Patton, George C
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 15
Article ID 1137
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015-11-16
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) alcoholic intoxication
Australia
prospective studies
risk
risk-taking
social environment
underage drinking
alcohol
adolescence
risky drinking
binge drinking
science & technology
life sciences & biomedicine
public, environmental & occupational health
Summary BACKGROUND: There are limited longitudinal data on the associations between different social contexts of alcohol use and risky adolescent drinking.

METHODS: Australian prospective longitudinal cohort of 1943 adolescents with 6 assessment waves at ages 14-17 years. Drinkers were asked where and how frequently they drank. Contexts were: at home with family, at home alone, at a party with friends, in a park/car, or at a bar/nightclub. The outcomes were prevalence and incidence of risky drinking (≥5 standard drinks (10g alcohol) on a day, past week) and very risky drinking (>20 standard drinks for males and >11 for females) in early (waves 1-2) and late (waves 3-6) adolescence.

RESULTS: Forty-four percent (95 % CI: 41-46 %) reported past-week risky drinking on at least one wave during adolescence (waves 1-6). Drinking at a party was the most common repeated drinking context in early adolescence (28 %, 95 % CI 26-30 %); 15 % reported drinking repeatedly (3+ times) with their family in early adolescence (95 % CI: 14-17 %). For all contexts (including drinking with family), drinking 3+ times in a given context was associated with increased the risk of risky drinking in later adolescence. These effects remained apparent after adjustment for potential confounders (e.g. for drinking with family, adjusted RR 1.9; 95 % CI: 1.5-2.4). Similar patterns were observed for very risky drinking.

CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that consumption with family does not protect against risky drinking. Furthermore, parents who wish to minimise high risk drinking by their adolescent children might also limit their children's opportunities to consume alcohol in unsupervised settings.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2443-5
Field of Research 1117 Public Health And Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, Degenhardt et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30113846

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: PVC's Office - Health
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.