Openly accessible

Anthropometric and physical fitness comparisons between Australian and Qatari male sport school athletes

Hoffman, Daniel, Robertson, Sam, Bourdon, Pitre, Douglas, Andrew and Gastin, Paul 2018, Anthropometric and physical fitness comparisons between Australian and Qatari male sport school athletes, Asian Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.5812/asjsm.59620.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
gastin-anthropometricand-2018.pdf Published version application/pdf 483.23KB 4

Title Anthropometric and physical fitness comparisons between Australian and Qatari male sport school athletes
Author(s) Hoffman, DanielORCID iD for Hoffman, Daniel orcid.org/0000-0002-5147-5829
Robertson, Sam
Bourdon, Pitre
Douglas, Andrew
Gastin, PaulORCID iD for Gastin, Paul orcid.org/0000-0003-2320-7875
Journal name Asian Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume number 9
Issue number 3
Article ID e59620
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher Tehran University of Medical Sciences Press
Place of publication Tehran, Iran
Publication date 2018-09
ISSN 2008-000X
2008-7209
Keyword(s) student-athlete
body size
physical fitness
biological maturity
sport
Summary Background: The increasing focus on international sporting success has led to many countries introducing sport schools and academies. Limited empirical evidence exists that directly compares student-athletes from different continents. This study investigated whether male Australian and Qatari student-athletes differ in anthropometry, physical fitness and biological maturity.

Methods: 150 male student-athletes (72 Qatari, 78 Australian; age = 11.8-18.6 y) completed a fitness testing session involving anthropometric (standing height, sitting height, leg length, body mass, peak height velocity (PHV) measures) and physical capacity (40 m sprint, countermovement jump (CMJ), predicted maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) tests. Differences were assessed using a one-way multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), effect size (Cohen’s d) and regression coefficients.

Results: The Australian student-athletes possessed a greater standing height and body mass (P < 0.01) at their age at PHV (APHV) and had an increased rate of leg length development (P < 0.05) in contrast to the sitting height of the Qataris (P < 0.01). The Qatari student-athletes had significantly (P < 0.01) faster 40 m sprint times (mean±SD: 5.88±0.53 vs 6.19±0.44 s) and greater CMJ heights (36.9 ± 7.2 vs 34.0 ± 6.0 cm) than their Australian counterparts. Although not statistically different, the Qatari student-athletes also matured earlier (APHV: d = 0.35) and had greater aerobic power results (predicted VO2max: d = 0.22).

Conclusions: Despite lower stature and body mass values, Qatari student-athletes exhibited physical fitness ascendancy over their Australian counterparts.
Language eng
DOI 10.5812/asjsm.59620
Field of Research 1106 Human Movement And Sports Science
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30114015

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 21 Abstract Views, 6 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 08 Oct 2018, 15:32:43 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.