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Initial modelling and updates on cost effectiveness from the first 10 years of a spleen registry

Luu, Sarah, Jones, Penelope, Woolley, Ian, Spelman, Denis and Gold, Lisa 2018, Initial modelling and updates on cost effectiveness from the first 10 years of a spleen registry, Australian and New Zealand journal of public health, vol. 42, no. 5, pp. 463-466, doi: 10.1111/1753-6405.12832.

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Title Initial modelling and updates on cost effectiveness from the first 10 years of a spleen registry
Author(s) Luu, Sarah
Jones, Penelope
Woolley, Ian
Spelman, Denis
Gold, LisaORCID iD for Gold, Lisa orcid.org/0000-0002-2733-900X
Journal name Australian and New Zealand journal of public health
Volume number 42
Issue number 5
Start page 463
End page 466
Total pages 4
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2018-10
ISSN 1753-6405
Keyword(s) cost-effectiveness
registry
spleen
Summary OBJECTIVE: To validate our estimates from our original model and re-evaluate the cost-effectiveness of Spleen Australia, the Australian post-splenectomy registry, using our original model with updated model parameters based on advances in the literature and experience of the registry over the past decade.

METHODS: We revisited a decision model from 2005, comparing 1,000 hypothetical registered patients with asplenia or hyposplenism against 1,000 who were not registered, and updated the model parameters. The cost-effectiveness of the registry was evaluated from a healthcare perspective in terms of additional cost per case of overwhelming post-splenectomy infection (OPSI) avoided and as additional cost per life year gained.

RESULTS: Over a cohort lifetime the registry was associated with an additional cost of $125,724 per case of OPSI avoided or $19,286 per life year gained.

CONCLUSIONS: Despite our initial over-estimation of immunisation and chemoprophylaxis uptake and increases in unit costs, our re-evaluation confirmed use of the registry to be cost-effective. Implications for public health: Improved outcomes for patients with asplenia or hyposplenism can be achieved by a cost-effective registry. Additional research into effectiveness of interventions, OPSI prevalence associated with varying intervention use, and compliance rates over time after registration would provide improved accuracy of cost-effectiveness estimates.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12832
Field of Research 1117 Public Health And Health Services
1402 Applied Economics
1605 Policy And Administration
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30114018

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Population Health
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.