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Measuring children's sodium and potassium intakes in NZ: a pilot study

Eyles, Helen, Bhana, Neela, Lee, Sang Eun, Grimes, Carley, McLean, Rachael, Nowson, Caryl and Wall, Clare 2018, Measuring children's sodium and potassium intakes in NZ: a pilot study, Nutrients, vol. 10, no. 9, doi: 10.3390/nu10091198.

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Title Measuring children's sodium and potassium intakes in NZ: a pilot study
Author(s) Eyles, Helen
Bhana, Neela
Lee, Sang Eun
Grimes, CarleyORCID iD for Grimes, Carley orcid.org/0000-0002-9123-1888
McLean, Rachael
Nowson, CarylORCID iD for Nowson, Caryl orcid.org/0000-0001-6586-7965
Wall, Clare
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 10
Issue number 9
Total pages 17
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2018-09-01
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) Australasia
New Zealand
child
potassium
salt
sodium
Summary Low sodium and high potassium intakes in childhood protect against rises in blood pressure (BP) and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) later in life. Our aim was to pilot methods for collection of 24-h urine samples (gold standard) and diet recalls to assess sodium and potassium intakes and their food sources in 30 children aged 8⁻11 years at one New Zealand primary school. A diverse sample (n = 27) was recruited over a two-week period. All children provided a urine sample (71% complete) and interviewer-assisted 24-h diet recall (Intake24 software). Median (range) sodium intake was 2191 (1087 to 4786) mg/day (salt equivalent 5.5 g), potassium intake was 1776 (800⁻2981) mg/day, BP was 105 (84⁻129)/62 (53⁻89) mmHg, and sodium to potassium molar ratio was 2.0 (1.1⁻4.8). Frequent use of discretionary salt was uncommon. Major food sources of sodium were bread, pies and pastries, and bread and pasta-based dishes, and potassium were sauces and condiments, dairy products, and non-alcoholic beverages. Most participants provided adequate data and enjoyed taking part. A larger survey is warranted to confirm findings and inform a potential intervention(s). Small improvements to study procedures and resources should improve completeness of urine samples and quality of 24-h diet recall data.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu10091198
Field of Research 1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30114020

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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