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Social environment mediates cancer progression in Drosophila

Dawson, Erika H., Bailly, Tiphaine P. M., Dos Santos, Julie, Moreno, Céline, Devilliers, Maëlle, Maroni, Brigitte, Sueur, Cédric, Casali, Andreu, Ujvari, Beata, Thomas, Frederic, Montagne, Jacque and Mery, Frederic 2018, Social environment mediates cancer progression in Drosophila, Nature communications, vol. 9, no. 1, doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-05737-w.

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Title Social environment mediates cancer progression in Drosophila
Author(s) Dawson, Erika H.
Bailly, Tiphaine P. M.
Dos Santos, Julie
Moreno, Céline
Devilliers, Maëlle
Maroni, Brigitte
Sueur, Cédric
Casali, Andreu
Ujvari, BeataORCID iD for Ujvari, Beata orcid.org/0000-0003-2391-2988
Thomas, Frederic
Montagne, Jacque
Mery, Frederic
Journal name Nature communications
Volume number 9
Issue number 1
Article ID 3574
Total pages 7
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2018-09-03
ISSN 2041-1723
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
LIFE-SPAN
MELANOGASTER
STRESS
INFECTION
BEHAVIOR
TUMORS
AGE
TRANSMISSION
CONSPECIFICS
EXPERIENCE
Summary The influence of oncogenic phenomena on the ecology and evolution of animal species is becoming an important research topic. Similar to host-pathogen interactions, cancer negatively affects host fitness, which should lead to the selection of host control mechanisms, including behavioral traits that best minimize the proliferation of malignant cells. Social behavior is suggested to influence tumor progression. While the ecological benefits of sociality in gregarious species are widely acknowledged, only limited data are available on the role of the social environment on cancer progression. Here, we exposed adult Drosophila, with colorectal-like tumors, to different social environments. We show how subtle variations in social structure have dramatic effects on the progression of tumor growth. Finally, we reveal that flies can discriminate between individuals at different stages of tumor development and selectively choose their social environment accordingly. Our study demonstrates the reciprocal links between cancer and social interactions and how sociality may impact health and fitness in animals and its potential implications for disease ecology.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/s41467-018-05737-w
Field of Research MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, Mertens, Treml and von der Heyden
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30114105

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.