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Physical activity and fundamental motor skill performance of 5–10 year old children in three different playgrounds

Adams, Jessie, Veitch, Jenny and Barnett, Lisa 2018, Physical activity and fundamental motor skill performance of 5–10 year old children in three different playgrounds, International journal of environmental research and public health, vol. 15, no. 9, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.3390/ijerph15091896.

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Title Physical activity and fundamental motor skill performance of 5–10 year old children in three different playgrounds
Author(s) Adams, Jessie
Veitch, JennyORCID iD for Veitch, Jenny orcid.org/0000-0001-8962-0887
Barnett, LisaORCID iD for Barnett, Lisa orcid.org/0000-0002-9731-625X
Journal name International journal of environmental research and public health
Volume number 15
Issue number 9
Article ID 1896
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2018-08-31
ISSN 1660-4601
Keyword(s) physical activity
fundamental motor skills
playground
children
play
design
science & technology
life sciences & biomedicine
environmental science
public, environmental & occupational health
environmental sciences & ecology
Summary Playgrounds provide opportunities for children to engage in physical activity and develop their fundamental motor skills. The aim of this descriptive pilot study was to examine whether playground design facilitated different levels of physical activity and fundamental motor skills. Children aged 5 to 10 (n = 57) were recruited from three independent playgrounds located in Melbourne (Australia). Whilst playing, children wore accelerometers which measured time spent in physical activity and direct observations recorded fundamental motor skills and play equipment use. A general linear model with playground type as the predictor and adjusting for monitor wear-time identified whether mean time in physical activity was different for the three playgrounds. Frequencies and a one-way ANOVA assessed whether the observed mean number of fundamental motor skills varied between playgrounds. On average, 38.1% of time (12.0 min) was spent in moderate- vigorous-intensity physical activity. Children in the traditional playground (n = 16) engaged in more moderate-intensity physical activity (9.4 min) than children in the adventure playground (n = 21), (5.6 min) (p = 0.027). There were no significant associations with vigorous-intensity physical activity or fundamental motor skills between playgrounds. Children performed few fundamental motor skills but used a wider variety of equipment in the contemporary and adventure playgrounds. Playgrounds need to maximise opportunities for children to engage in physical activity and develop fundamental motor skills.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph15091896
Field of Research MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, the authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30114110

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.