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Identifying the prevalence and predictors of suicidal behaviours for indigenous males in custody

Shepherd, Stephane M., Spivak, Benjamin, Arabena, Kerry and Paradies, Yin 2018, Identifying the prevalence and predictors of suicidal behaviours for indigenous males in custody, BMC public health, vol. 18, no. 1, doi: 10.1186/s12889-018-6074-5.

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Title Identifying the prevalence and predictors of suicidal behaviours for indigenous males in custody
Author(s) Shepherd, Stephane M.
Spivak, Benjamin
Arabena, Kerry
Paradies, YinORCID iD for Paradies, Yin orcid.org/0000-0001-9927-7074
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 18
Issue number 1
Article ID 1159
Total pages 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2018-10-04
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander health
Indigenous population
Mental illness
Prison
Suicide
Summary BACKGROUND: High rates of suicidal behaviours among Indigenous Australians have been documented. Justice-involved individuals are also at a higher risk for engaging in suicidal behaviours. This study sought to ascertain the prevalence and correlates of suicidal behaviours for 107 Indigenous adult males in custody in Victoria, Australia.

METHODS: Participants undertook a structured interview comprising a psychiatric assessment. Information on suicidal behaviours (ideation and attempts), socio-demographics, environmental stressors, negative life events and mental health was obtained.

RESULTS: A high proportion of Indigenous males in custody experienced lifetime suicidal ideation (63.7%) and over one-half had attempted suicide (54.5%). A smaller, yet significant number of participants experienced ideation over the past 12 months (27.9%). Having a loved one pass away within the past 12 months predicted recent ideation; lifetime ideation and a diagnosis of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder predicted a lifetime suicide attempt.

CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of suicidal behaviours among Indigenous people in custody is remarkably high. Correlates of suicidal behaviours for Indigenous people in custody in this study likely manifest in the community, denoting an urgent public health response. Prevention must begin in communities at-risk for suicidal behaviours. The development of low intensity mental health service infrastructure in communities to promote awareness and provide accessible, least restrictive support and treatment is necessary. Correctional institutions must also continue to improve custodial suicide prevention and management initiatives.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-6074-5
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health And Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30114238

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.