Openly accessible

Impact of rising sea levels on Australian fur seals

McLean, Lachlan J., George, Steve, Ierodiaconou, Daniel, Kirkwood, Roger J. and Arnould, John P. Y. 2018, Impact of rising sea levels on Australian fur seals, PeerJ, vol. 6, pp. 1-23, doi: 10.7717/peerj.5786.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
ierodiaconou-impactof-2018.pdf Published version application/pdf 2.42MB 31

Title Impact of rising sea levels on Australian fur seals
Author(s) McLean, Lachlan J.
George, Steve
Ierodiaconou, DanielORCID iD for Ierodiaconou, Daniel orcid.org/0000-0002-7832-4801
Kirkwood, Roger J.
Arnould, John P. Y.ORCID iD for Arnould, John P. Y. orcid.org/0000-0003-1124-9330
Journal name PeerJ
Volume number 6
Article ID e5786
Start page 1
End page 23
Total pages 23
Publisher PeerJ, Ltd.
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2018
ISSN 2167-8359
Keyword(s) Arctocephalus pusillus
Pup mortality
Sea level
Storm surge
Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
ARCTOCEPHALUS-PUSILLUS-DORIFERUS
CLIMATE-CHANGE
MARINE MAMMALS
PUP PRODUCTION
SITE FIDELITY
NEW-ZEALAND
HABITAT USE
SYSTEMS
PROJECTIONS
EVOLUTION
Summary Global warming is leading to many unprecedented changes in the ocean-climate system. Sea levels are rising at an increasing rate and are amplifying the impact of storm surges along coastlines. As variability in the timing and strength of storm surges has been shown to affect pup mortality in the Australian fur seal (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus), there is a need to identify the potential impacts of increased sea level and storm surges on the breeding areas of this important marine predator in Bass Strait, south-eastern Australia. Using high-resolution aerial photography and topographic data, the present study assessed the impacts of future inundation levels on both current and potential breeding habitats at each colony. Inundation from storm surges, based on a predicted rise in sea level, was modeled at each colony from 2012 to 2100. As sea level increases, progressively less severe storm surge conditions will be required to exceed current inundation levels and, thus, have the potential for greater impacts on pup mortality at Australian fur seal colonies. The results of the present study indicate that by 2100, a 1-in-10 year storm will inundate more habitat on average than a present-day 1-in-100 year storm. The study highlights the site-specific nature of storm surge impacts, and in particular the importance of local colony topography and surrounding bathymetry with small, low-lying colonies impacted the most. An increased severity of storm surges will result in either an increase in pup mortality rates associated with storm surges, or the dispersal of individuals to higher ground and/or new colonies.
Language eng
DOI 10.7717/peerj.5786
Field of Research 060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl Marine Ichthyology)
060207 Population Ecology
060306 Evolutionary Impacts of Climate Change
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2018, McLean et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30114814

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 125 Abstract Views, 32 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 30 Oct 2018, 08:03:47 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.