Associations between maternal concern about child's weight and related behaviours and maternal weight-related parenting practices: a cross-sectional study

Haines, Jess, Downing, Katherine L., Tang, Lisa, Campbell, Karen J. and Hesketh, Kylie D. 2018, Associations between maternal concern about child's weight and related behaviours and maternal weight-related parenting practices: a cross-sectional study, International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 15, no. 1, doi: 10.1186/s12966-018-0738-5.

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Title Associations between maternal concern about child's weight and related behaviours and maternal weight-related parenting practices: a cross-sectional study
Author(s) Haines, Jess
Downing, Katherine L.ORCID iD for Downing, Katherine L. orcid.org/0000-0002-6552-8506
Tang, Lisa
Campbell, Karen J.ORCID iD for Campbell, Karen J. orcid.org/0000-0002-4499-3396
Hesketh, Kylie D.ORCID iD for Hesketh, Kylie D. orcid.org/0000-0002-2702-7110
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 15
Issue number 1
Article ID 104
Total pages 9
Publisher BMC
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2018-10-24
ISSN 1479-5868
1479-5868
Keyword(s) Food parenting
Maternal concern
Media parenting
Physical activity parenting
Weight
Adult
Australia
Body Mass Index
Body Weight
Child Behavior
Child Rearing
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Feeding Behavior
Female
Health Promotion
Humans
Male
Mothers
Parenting
Pediatric Obesity
Sedentary Behavior
Surveys and Questionnaires
Thinness
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
Physiology
RESTRICTIVE FEEDING PRACTICES
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
PRESCHOOL-CHILDREN
OVERWEIGHT
OBESITY
DIETARY
FATHERS
HEALTH
INTERVENTION
PERCEPTIONS
Summary BACKGROUND: Parents influence their children's weight-related behaviours through their parenting practices, which are often a focal point of obesity prevention interventions. This study examined associations of maternal concern about their child's weight, dietary intake, physical activity, and media use with maternal food, physical activity, and media parenting practices. METHODS: Mothers (n = 310) reported their level of concern regarding their child's weight and related behaviours and their weight-related parenting practices when their child was 5 years of age as part of the Melbourne Infant Feeding Activity and Nutrition Trial (InFANT) Program. We used linear regression analyses with estimation by generalized estimating equations to examine associations of maternal concern and maternal parenting practices. RESULTS: Slightly more than 60% of mothers reported at least one concern related to their children's weight or related behaviours. Excessive media use was the most commonly endorsed concern among mothers (45.2%). Compared to mothers who were unconcerned about their child's weight, mothers who were concerned about their child weighing too much reported higher levels of controlling feeding practices, i.e., restrictive feeding, lower levels of co-participation of physical activity, and higher levels of using media to control child behaviour. Mothers who were concerned their child weighed too little reported higher levels of controlling feeding practices, i.e., restrictive feeding, pressure to eat. Similarly, mothers who were concerned about their child's eating (eating too much or too little) reported higher levels of controlling feeding practices. Mothers who were concerned about their child using too much media reported higher levels of using media to regulate their child's behaviour and providing opportunities for their child to use media. CONCLUSION: Mothers who were concerned about their child's weight, dietary intake, physical activity and media use reported higher levels of controlling parenting practices, i.e., pressure to eat, and lower levels of health promoting parenting practices, i.e., co-participation in physical activity. Longitudinal research is needed to elucidate temporal order and specific mechanisms of these associations.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12966-018-0738-5
Field of Research 11 Medical And Health Sciences
13 Education
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30114836

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