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Predicted impacts of climate warming on aerobic performance and upper thermal tolerance of six tropical freshwater fishes spanning three continents

Lapointe, Dominique, Cooperman, Michael S., Chapman, Lauren J., Clark, Timothy D., Val, Adalberto L., Ferreira, Marcio S., Balirwa, John S., Mbabazi, Dismas, Mwanja, Matthew, Chhom, Limhong, Hannah, Lee, Kaufman, Les, Farrell, Anthony P. and Cooke, Steven J. 2018, Predicted impacts of climate warming on aerobic performance and upper thermal tolerance of six tropical freshwater fishes spanning three continents, Conservation physiology, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 1-19, doi: 10.1093/conphys/coy056.

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Title Predicted impacts of climate warming on aerobic performance and upper thermal tolerance of six tropical freshwater fishes spanning three continents
Author(s) Lapointe, Dominique
Cooperman, Michael S.
Chapman, Lauren J.
Clark, Timothy D.ORCID iD for Clark, Timothy D. orcid.org/0000-0001-8738-3347
Val, Adalberto L.
Ferreira, Marcio S.
Balirwa, John S.
Mbabazi, Dismas
Mwanja, Matthew
Chhom, Limhong
Hannah, Lee
Kaufman, Les
Farrell, Anthony P.
Cooke, Steven J.
Journal name Conservation physiology
Volume number 6
Issue number 1
Start page 1
End page 19
Total pages 19
Publisher Oxford Academic
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2018-10
ISSN 2051-1434
Keyword(s) Aerobic scope
climate change
critical thermal maximum
food security
tropical inland fisheries
Summary Equatorial fishes, and the critically important fisheries based on them, are thought to be at-risk from climate warming because the fishes have evolved in a relatively aseasonal environment and possess narrow thermal tolerance windows that are close to upper thermal limits. We assessed survival, growth, aerobic performance and critical thermal maxima (CTmax) following acute and 21 d exposures to temperatures up to 4°C higher than current maxima for six species of freshwater fishes indigenous to tropical countries and of importance for human consumption. All six species showed 1.3–1.7°C increases in CTmax with a 4°C rise in acclimation temperature, values which match up well with fishes from other climatic regions, and five species had survival >87% at all temperatures over the treatment period. Specific growth rates varied among and within each species in response to temperature treatments. For all species, the response of resting metabolic rate (RMR) was consistently more dynamic than for maximum metabolic rate, but in general both acute temperature exposure and thermal acclimation had only modest effects on aerobic scope (AS). However, RMR increased after warm acclimation in 5 of 6 species, suggesting incomplete metabolic compensation. Taken in total, our results show that each species had some ability to perform at temperatures up to 4°C above current maxima, yet also displayed certain areas of concern for their long-term welfare. We therefore suggest caution against the overly broad generalization that all tropical freshwater fish species will face severe challenges from warming temperatures in the coming decades and that future vulnerability assessments should integrate multiple performance metrics as opposed to relying on a single response metric. Given the societal significance of inland fisheries in many parts of the tropics, our results clearly demonstrate the need for more species-specific studies of adaptive capacity to climate change-related challenges.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/conphys/coy056
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30114851

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.