Urinary sodium is positively associated with urinary free cortisol and total cortisol metabolites in a cross-sectional sample of Australian schoolchildren aged 5-12 years and their mothers

Torres, Susan J., Grimes, Carley, Nowson, Caryl A., Jayasinghe, Sisitha U., Bruce, Clinton R., Mason, Shaun A., He, Feng J. and Turner, Anne I. 2019, Urinary sodium is positively associated with urinary free cortisol and total cortisol metabolites in a cross-sectional sample of Australian schoolchildren aged 5-12 years and their mothers, British journal of nutrition, vol. 121, no. 2, pp. 164-171, doi: 10.1017/S0007114518003148.

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Title Urinary sodium is positively associated with urinary free cortisol and total cortisol metabolites in a cross-sectional sample of Australian schoolchildren aged 5-12 years and their mothers
Author(s) Torres, Susan J.ORCID iD for Torres, Susan J. orcid.org/0000-0002-2599-1934
Grimes, CarleyORCID iD for Grimes, Carley orcid.org/0000-0002-9123-1888
Nowson, Caryl A.ORCID iD for Nowson, Caryl A. orcid.org/0000-0001-6586-7965
Jayasinghe, Sisitha U.
Bruce, Clinton R.ORCID iD for Bruce, Clinton R. orcid.org/0000-0002-0515-3343
Mason, Shaun A.ORCID iD for Mason, Shaun A. orcid.org/0000-0002-6138-2239
He, Feng J.
Turner, Anne I.ORCID iD for Turner, Anne I. orcid.org/0000-0002-0682-2860
Journal name British journal of nutrition
Volume number 121
Issue number 2
Start page 164
End page 171
Total pages 8
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2019-01
ISSN 1475-2662
Keyword(s) 11βHSD 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase
Children
Cortisol
Dietary intakes
Mothers
Potassium
Sodium
Urinary electrolytes
11βHSD 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
BODY-MASS INDEX
HAIR CORTISOL
INTERMEDIATE PHENOTYPE
SALIVARY CORTISOL
SALT
STRESS
EXCRETION
RECEPTOR
Summary High Na intake and chronically elevated cortisol levels are independently associated with the development of chronic diseases. In adults, high Na intake is associated with high levels of urinary cortisol. We aimed to determine the association between urinary Na and K and urinary cortisol in a cross-sectional sample of Australian schoolchildren and their mothers. Participants were a sample of Australian children (n 120) and their mothers (n 100) recruited through primary schools. We assessed Na, K, free cortisol and cortisol metabolites in one 24 h urine collection. Associations between 24 h urinary electrolytes and 24 h urinary cortisol were assessed using multilevel mixed-effects linear regression models. In children, urinary Na was positively associated with urinary free cortisol (β=0·31, 95 % CI 0·19, 0·44) and urinary cortisol metabolites (β=0·006, 95 % CI 0·002, 0·010). Positive associations were also observed between urinary K and urinary free cortisol (β=0·65, 95 % CI 0·23, 1·07) and urinary cortisol metabolites (β=0·02, 95 % CI 0·03, 0·031). In mothers, urinary Na was positively associated with urinary free cortisol (β=0·23, 95 % CI 0·01, 0·50) and urinary cortisol metabolites (β=0·008, 95 % CI 0·0007, 0·016). Our findings show that daily Na and K intake were positively associated with cortisol production in children and their mothers. Investigation of the mechanisms involved and the potential impact of Na reduction on cortisol levels in these populations is warranted.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S0007114518003148
Field of Research 0702 Animal Production
1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
0908 Food Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Author(s)
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30115115

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research
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