Mothers' and father's perceptions of the risks and benefits of screen time and physical activity during early childhood: a qualitative study

Hinkley, Trina and Mccann, Jennifer 2018, Mothers' and father's perceptions of the risks and benefits of screen time and physical activity during early childhood: a qualitative study, BMC public health, vol. 18, no. 1271, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1186/s12889-018-6199-6.

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Title Mothers' and father's perceptions of the risks and benefits of screen time and physical activity during early childhood: a qualitative study
Author(s) Hinkley, TrinaORCID iD for Hinkley, Trina orcid.org/0000-0003-2742-8579
Mccann, JenniferORCID iD for Mccann, Jennifer orcid.org/0000-0002-8940-978X
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 18
Issue number 1271
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2018-11-20
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) early childhood
physical activity
active play
parents
perceptions
screen time
adult
Australia
child, preschool
exercise
fathers
mothers
perception
science & technology
life sciences & biomedicine
public, environmental & occupational health
Summary BACKGROUND: This study sought to explore mothers' and fathers' perceptions of the risks and benefits of screen time and active play during early childhood. METHODS: In-depth semi structured telephone interviews were conducted with mothers and fathers (n = 28) of children aged 3-5 years who had earlier taken part in a larger quantitative study in Australia and identified willingness to be re-contacted were recruited. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analysed using NviVo. Coding was performed to produce themes. Quotes were extracted from the transcripts to illustrate common responses. COREQ guidelines for qualitative papers were followed. RESULTS: Parents reported active play was beneficial for many health and developmental outcomes such as imagination, enjoyment and socialisation, while reporting risks such as safety and stranger danger. There were mixed perceptions of screen time, with benefits such as learning, education and relaxation, and risks including habit formation, inappropriate content, negative cognitive and social outcome, and detriments to health being reported. A few differences between mothers' and fathers' perceptions were evident. CONCLUSION: This study identified that some parental perceptions of benefits and risks of screen time and active play were consistent with published evidence, while others were contradicted by current evidence. Future studies should consider evidence-based education to ensure parents are aware of evidence-based outcomes of children's behaviours. Interventions may wish to capitalise on parents perceived benefits to enhance engagement.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-6199-6
Field of Research 1117 Public Health And Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Author(s)
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30115662

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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