Girls growing up Gordie: the post-apocalyptic heroine and the Australian girl reader of Isobelle Carmody’s Obernewtyn Chronicles

McAlister, Jodi 2015, Girls growing up Gordie: the post-apocalyptic heroine and the Australian girl reader of Isobelle Carmody’s Obernewtyn Chronicles, TEXT: journal of writing and writing programs, vol. 32, pp. 1-15.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Girls growing up Gordie: the post-apocalyptic heroine and the Australian girl reader of Isobelle Carmody’s Obernewtyn Chronicles
Author(s) McAlister, JodiORCID iD for McAlister, Jodi orcid.org/0000-0003-4529-9205
Journal name TEXT: journal of writing and writing programs
Volume number 32
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher Australasian Association of Writing Programs
Place of publication Nathan, Qld.
Publication date 2015-10-01
ISSN 1327-9556
Keyword(s) creative writing
young adult
girlhood
dystopia
Obernewtyn Chronicles
Isobelle Carmody
Summary Australian young adult (YA) fiction has a post-apocalyptic tradition that considerably predates dystopia’s current global popularity. Long before characters like Katniss Everdeen and Tris Prior emerged into mainstream popular consciousness, Australian YA fiction gave us several strong heroines struggling for a better life in a post-apocalyptic setting. One such was Elspeth Gordie of Isobelle Carmody’s Obernewtyn Chronicles.The Obernewtyn Chronicles are unusual in that they have been published across a considerable span of time. The first book was published in 1987, while the final instalment is not due to be published until the end of 2015. Numerous readers of the series have, in many ways, grown up with it: discovering it as pre-teens or teenagers, and continuing to follow it into adulthood. The first Obernewtyn fan site – obernewtyn.net – was established in 1999, and continues to be active to this day. However, despite the current popularity of texts like The Hunger Games and Divergent, the Obernewtyn Chronicles are not especially well known outside Australia. This article will explore the ways in which fans interact with and respond to the Obernewtyn books, and the ways in which this has evolved and changed. It will investigate two key questions. Why have the Obernewtyn Chronicles appealed so strongly to an Australian audience? And why have they appealed so strongly to a girl audience? I will draw on several different critical theories to unpack this appeal, including postcolonial theory, feminist theory, girlhood studies, and auto-ethnography. I will also integrate this with reader-response theory, looking closely at the responses of readers who began reading these books as children and who are continuing to engage with them decades later.
Language eng
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1904 Performing Arts and Creative Writing
HERDC Research category C2.1 Other contribution to refereed journal
Copyright notice ©2015, AAWP
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30116003

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Arts and Education
School of Communication and Creative Arts
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 3 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Sun, 09 Dec 2018, 12:38:20 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.