Increased placental nutrient transporter expression at midgestation after maternal growth hormone treatment in pigs: a placental mechanism for increased fetal growth

Tung, Elena, Roberts, Claire T., Heinemann, Gary K., De Blasio, Miles J., Kind, Karen L., van Wettere, William H.E.J., Owens, Julie A. and Gatford, Kathryn L. 2012, Increased placental nutrient transporter expression at midgestation after maternal growth hormone treatment in pigs: a placental mechanism for increased fetal growth, Biology of reproduction, vol. 87, no. 5, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1095/biolreprod.112.100222.

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Title Increased placental nutrient transporter expression at midgestation after maternal growth hormone treatment in pigs: a placental mechanism for increased fetal growth
Author(s) Tung, Elena
Roberts, Claire T.
Heinemann, Gary K.
De Blasio, Miles J.
Kind, Karen L.
van Wettere, William H.E.J.
Owens, Julie A.ORCID iD for Owens, Julie A. orcid.org/0000-0002-7498-1353
Gatford, Kathryn L.
Journal name Biology of reproduction
Volume number 87
Issue number 5
Article ID 126
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2012-11-01
ISSN 1529-7268
Keyword(s) Amino Acid Transport System A
Animals
Female
Fetal Development
Fetal Weight
Gestational Age
Glucose Transporter Type 1
Growth Hormone
Immunohistochemistry
Organ Size
Placenta
Pregnancy
Receptor, IGF Type 1
Sus scrofa
Trophoblasts
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Reproductive Biology
nutrient transport
pig
trophoblast
RECOMBINANT PORCINE SOMATOTROPIN
AMINO-ACID-TRANSPORT
GLUCOSE-TRANSPORTER
EARLY-PREGNANCY
BIRTH-WEIGHT
EXOGENOUS SOMATOTROPIN
POSTNATAL-GROWTH
UNDERFED PIGS
IGF-I
GESTATION
Summary Growth hormone (GH) is important in maternal adaptation to pregnancy, and maternal circulating GH concentrations are reduced in human growth-restricted pregnancies. In the pig, maternal GH treatment throughout early to mid pregnancy increases fetal growth, despite constraining effects of adolescent and primiparous pregnancy, high litter size, and restricted maternal nutrition. Because GH cannot cross the placenta and does not increase placental weight, we hypothesized that its effects on fetal growth might be via improved placental structure or function. We therefore investigated effects of maternal GH treatment in pigs on structural correlates of placental function and placental expression of nutrient transporters important to fetal growth. Multiparous (sows) and primiparous pregnant pigs (gilts) were treated with GH (~15 μg kg(-1) day(-1)) or vehicle from Days 25-50 of gestation (n = 7-8 per group, term ~115 days). Placentas were collected at Day 50 of gestation, and we measured structural correlates of function and expression of SLC2A1 (previously known as GLUT1) and SLC38A2 (previously known as SNAT2) nutrient transporters. Maternal GH treatment did not alter placental size or structure, increased protein expression of SLC2A1 in trophoblast (+35%; P = 0.037) and on its basal membrane (+44%; P = 0.011), and increased SLC38A2 protein expression in the basal (+44%; P = 0.001) but not the apical cytoplasm of trophoblast. Our findings suggest that maternal GH treatment increases fetal growth, in part, by enhancing placental nutrient transporter protein expression and hence fetal nutrient supply as well as trophoblast proliferation and differentiation and may have the potential to ameliorate intrauterine growth restriction.
Language eng
DOI 10.1095/biolreprod.112.100222
Field of Research 11 Medical And Health Sciences
06 Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30116801

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Office of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research)
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