Maternal low-dose porcine somatotropin treatment in late gestation increases progeny weight at birth and weaning in sows but not in gilts

Gatford, K. L., Smits, R. J., Collins, C. L., De Blasio, M. J., Roberts, C. T., Nottle, M. B., van Wettere, W. H. E. J., Kind, K. L. and Owens, J. A. 2012, Maternal low-dose porcine somatotropin treatment in late gestation increases progeny weight at birth and weaning in sows but not in gilts, Journal of animal science, vol. 90, no. 5, pp. 1428-1435, doi: 10.2527/jas.2011-4227.

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Title Maternal low-dose porcine somatotropin treatment in late gestation increases progeny weight at birth and weaning in sows but not in gilts
Author(s) Gatford, K. L.
Smits, R. J.
Collins, C. L.
De Blasio, M. J.
Roberts, C. T.
Nottle, M. B.
van Wettere, W. H. E. J.
Kind, K. L.
Owens, J. A.ORCID iD for Owens, J. A. orcid.org/0000-0002-7498-1353
Journal name Journal of animal science
Volume number 90
Issue number 5
Start page 1428
End page 1435
Total pages 8
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2012-05
ISSN 1525-3163
Keyword(s) Adipose Tissue
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Body Weight
Eating
Female
Growth Hormone
Lactation
Parity
Pregnancy
Swine
Weaning
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Agriculture, Dairy & Animal Science
Agriculture
birth weight
litter size
pig
somatotropin
subsequent reproduction
HORMONE-RELEASING FACTOR
EARLY-MID PREGNANCY
GROWTH-HORMONE
BODY-COMPOSITION
PLACENTAL SIZE
UNDERFED PIGS
FETAL-GROWTH
LAST 3RD
PERFORMANCE
Summary Birth weight positively predicts postnatal growth and performance in pigs and can be increased by sustained maternal porcine ST (pST) treatment from d 25 to 100 of pregnancy (term ∼115 d). The objective of this study was to test whether a shorter period of maternal pST treatment in late pregnancy (d 75 to 100) could also increase birth and weaning weights of progeny under commercial conditions. Gilts (parity 0) and sows (parities 2 and 3) were not injected (controls) or injected daily with pST (gilts: 2.5 mg•d(-1), sows: 4.0 mg•d(-1), both ∼13 to 14 μg•kg(-1)•d(-1)) from d 75 to 100 of pregnancy. Litter size and BW were recorded at birth and weaning, and dams were followed through the subsequent mating and pregnancy. Maternal pST injections from d 75 to 100 increased litter average progeny weight at birth (+96 g, P = 0.034) and weaning (+430 g, P = 0.038) in sows, but had no effect on progeny weight in gilts (each P > 0.5). Maternal pST treatment did not affect numbers of live-born piglets and increased numbers of stillborn piglets in sows only (+0.4 pigs/litter, P = 0.034). Maternal pST treatment did not affect subsequent reproduction of dams. Together with our previous data, these results suggest that sustained increases in maternal pST are required to increase fetal and postnatal growth in gilt progeny, but that increasing maternal pST in late pregnancy may only be an effective strategy to increase fetal and possibly postnatal growth in sow progeny.
Language eng
DOI 10.2527/jas.2011-4227
Field of Research 07 Agricultural And Veterinary Sciences
06 Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, American Society of Animal Science
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30116804

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Office of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research
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