Public health crises in popular media: how viral outbreak films affect the public's health literacy

Kendal, Yvette 2019, Public health crises in popular media: how viral outbreak films affect the public's health literacy, Medical humanities, doi: 10.1136/medhum-2018-011446.

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Title Public health crises in popular media: how viral outbreak films affect the public's health literacy
Author(s) Kendal, YvetteORCID iD for Kendal, Yvette orcid.org/0000-0002-8414-0427
Journal name Medical humanities
Total pages 9
Publisher BMJ Publishing
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2019-01-19
ISSN 1473-4265
Keyword(s) film
medical ethics/bioethics
medical humanities
public health
Summary Infectious disease epidemics are widely recognised as a serious global threat. The need to educate the public regarding health and safety during an epidemic is particularly apparent when considering that behavioural changes can have a profound impact on disease spread. While there is a large body of literature focused on the opportunities and pitfalls of engaging mass news media during an epidemic, given the pervasiveness of popular film in modern society there is a relative lack of research regarding the potential role of fictional media in educating the public about epidemics. There is a growing collection of viral outbreak films that might serve as a source of information about epidemics for popular culture consumers that warrants critical examination. As such, this paper considers the motivating factors behind engaging preventive behaviours during a disease outbreak, and the role news and popular media may have in influencing these behaviours.
Notes In Press
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/medhum-2018-011446
Field of Research 1199 Other Medical and Health Sciences
2201 Applied Ethics
2202 History and Philosophy of Specific Fields
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30117242

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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