Effect of long-term nutraceutical and dietary supplement use on cognition in the elderly: a 10-year systematic review of randomised controlled trials

D'Cunha, Nathan M., Georgousopoulou, Ekavi N., Dadigamuwage, Lakshika, Kellett, Jane, Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B., Thomas, Jackson, McKune, Andrew J., Mellor, Duane D. and Naumovski, Nenad 2018, Effect of long-term nutraceutical and dietary supplement use on cognition in the elderly: a 10-year systematic review of randomised controlled trials, British journal of nutrition, vol. 119, no. 3, pp. 280-298, doi: 10.1017/S0007114517003452.

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Title Effect of long-term nutraceutical and dietary supplement use on cognition in the elderly: a 10-year systematic review of randomised controlled trials
Author(s) D'Cunha, Nathan M.
Georgousopoulou, Ekavi N.
Dadigamuwage, Lakshika
Kellett, Jane
Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B.
Thomas, Jackson
McKune, Andrew J.
Mellor, Duane D.
Naumovski, Nenad
Journal name British journal of nutrition
Volume number 119
Issue number 3
Start page 280
End page 298
Total pages 19
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2018-02-14
ISSN 1475-2662
Keyword(s) AD Alzheimer’s disease
ADAS-cog cognitive subscale of Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale
APOE4 apoE e4
CDR Clinical Dementia Rating Scale
CSF cerebrospinal fluid
FADS fatty acid desaturase
Hcy homocysteine
MCI mild cognitive impairment
MMSE Mini-Mental State Examination
QoL quality of life
RCT randomised controlled trial
TICS Telephone Interview of Cognitive Status
Cognition
Dementia
Dietary supplements
Elderly
Mild cognitive impairment
Nutraceuticals
Vitamins
AD Alzheimer’s disease
ADAS-cog cognitive subscale of Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale
APOE4 apoE e4
CDR Clinical Dementia Rating Scale
CSF cerebrospinal fluid
FADS fatty acid desaturase
Hcy homocysteine
MCI mild cognitive impairment
MMSE Mini-Mental State Examination
QoL quality of life
RCT randomised controlled trial
TICS Telephone Interview of Cognitive Status
Summary Nutraceuticals have generated interest as a way to mitigate the cognitive decline in older adults. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the evidence for these claims from the scientific literature in randomised, double-blinded, controlled trials (duration: ≥1 year; participants: n≥100; age(mean): ≥65 years). Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we searched four electronic databases (PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL and Web of Science) and identified twenty-five studies published between the 15·June·2006 and 14·June·2016. Interventions included B-vitamins, n-3 fatty acids, antioxidant vitamins and herbs. Of the B-vitamin studies, four found benefits to cognition with supplementation. The first of these B-vitamin studies, in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (n 266; duration=2 years), included benefit to executive function (P=0·015) and improvements in the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) among participants with baseline homocysteine above 11·3 µmol/l (P<0·001). In the same sample, the second study found cognitive benefits of B-vitamins dependent on the higher baseline plasma n-3 fatty acid status. The third B-vitamin study (n 900; duration=2 years) reported improved performance in immediate (P=0·046) and delayed recall (P=0·013), whereas the fourth study (n 856; duration=2 years) reported slower rate of cognitive decline in the MMSE (P=0·05). One study investigating DHA treatment (n 402; duration=1·5 years) revealed the slower rate of cognitive change in apoE e4 non-carriers (P=0·03). As only five included studies revealed notable benefits, presently based on the specific compounds explored here, there is not compelling evidence to support the use nutraceuticals to improve cognition in the elderly. Future long-term trials of nutraceuticals should investigate interactions with lifestyle, blood biomarkers and genetic risk factors.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S0007114517003452
Field of Research 0702 Animal Production
1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
0908 Food Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30117313

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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