Anti-TNFα therapy in IBD alters brain activity reflecting visceral sensory function and cognitive-affective biases

Gray, Marcus A., Chao, Che-Yung, Staudacher, Heidi, Kolosky, Natasha A., Talley, Nicholas J. and Holtmann, Gerald 2018, Anti-TNFα therapy in IBD alters brain activity reflecting visceral sensory function and cognitive-affective biases, PLoS one, vol. 13, no. 3, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0193542.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Anti-TNFα therapy in IBD alters brain activity reflecting visceral sensory function and cognitive-affective biases
Author(s) Gray, Marcus A.
Chao, Che-Yung
Staudacher, HeidiORCID iD for Staudacher, Heidi orcid.org/0000-0001-6704-2131
Kolosky, Natasha A.
Talley, Nicholas J.
Holtmann, Gerald
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 13
Issue number 3
Article ID e0193542
Total pages 17
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2018-03
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER
INFLAMMATORY-BOWEL-DISEASE
QUALITY-OF-LIFE
CROHNS-DISEASE
FECAL CALPROTECTIN
ANXIETY
COMORBIDITY
SYMPTOMS
IMPROVES
Summary BACKGROUND: In inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), immune activation with increased circulating TNF-α is linked to the intensity of gastrointestinal symptoms and depression or anxiety. A central feature of depression is cognitive biases linked to negative attributions about self, the world and the future. We aimed to assess the effects of anti-TNFα therapy on the central processing of self-attribution biases and visceral afferent information in patients with Crohn's disease. METHODS: We examined 9 patients with Crohn's disease (age 26.1±10.6. yrs, 5 female, 5 ileocolonic, 2 colonic and 2 ileal disease) during chronic anti-TNFα therapy (5 adalimumab, 4 infliximab). Patients were studied twice in randomized order before and after anti-TNFα administration. On each occasion patients underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the brain during a test of implicit attribution biases regarding sickness/health and undertook a standardized nutrient challenge. RESULTS: Following anti-TNFα treatment, ratings of 'fullness' following nutrient challenge reduced compared to pre-treatment ratings (p<0.05). Reaction times revealed improved processing of self-related and positive health words, consistent with improved implicit sense of wellbeing that correlated with improvements in sensory function after treatment (r = 0.67, p<0.05). Treatment-associated improvements in implicit processing were mirrored by alterations of prefrontal, amygdala, posterior cingulate and visual regions. Between patients, the degree of functional amygdala change was additionally explained by individual differences in attention regulation and body awareness rankings. CONCLUSION: In patients with Crohn's disease, anti-TNFα administration reduces visceral sensitivity and improves implicit cognitive-affective biases linked to alterations in limbic (amygdala) function.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0193542
Field of Research MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, Gray et al.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30117357

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
Open Access Checking
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 4 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 31 Jan 2019, 10:14:19 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.