Fermentable carbohydrate restriction reduces luminal bifidobacteria and gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

Staudacher, Heidi M, Lomer, Miranda CE, Anderson, Jacqueline L, Barrett, Jacqueline S, Muir, Jane G, Irving, Peter M and Whelan, Kevin 2012, Fermentable carbohydrate restriction reduces luminal bifidobacteria and gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome, Journal of nutrition, vol. 142, no. 8, pp. 1510-1518, doi: 10.3945/jn.112.159285.

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Title Fermentable carbohydrate restriction reduces luminal bifidobacteria and gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome
Author(s) Staudacher, Heidi MORCID iD for Staudacher, Heidi M orcid.org/0000-0001-6704-2131
Lomer, Miranda CE
Anderson, Jacqueline L
Barrett, Jacqueline S
Muir, Jane G
Irving, Peter M
Whelan, Kevin
Journal name Journal of nutrition
Volume number 142
Issue number 8
Start page 1510
End page 1518
Total pages 9
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2012-08
ISSN 1541-6100
Keyword(s) fluorescent in situ hybridization
carbohydrates
diet
feces
follow-up
signs and symptoms
digestive
bacteria
phenobarbital
irritable bowel syndrome
prebiotics
microbiome
stool specimen
science & technology
life sciences & biomedicine
nutrition & dietetics
Summary Preliminary studies indicate that dietary restriction of fermentable short-chain carbohydrates improves symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Prebiotic fructo-oligosaccharides and galacto-oligosaccharides stimulate colonic bifidobacteria. However, the effect of restricting fermentable short-chain carbohydrates on the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota has never been examined. This randomized controlled trial aimed to investigate the effects of fermentable carbohydrate restriction on luminal microbiota, SCFA, and GI symptoms in patients with IBS. Patients with IBS were randomized to the intervention diet or habitual diet for 4 wk. The incidence and severity of symptoms and stool output were recorded for 7 d at baseline and follow-up. A stool sample was collected and analyzed for bacterial groups using fluorescent in situ hybridization. Of 41 patients randomized, 6 were withdrawn. At follow-up, there was lower intake of total short-chain fermentable carbohydrates in the intervention group compared with controls (P = 0.001). The total luminal bacteria at follow-up did not differ between groups; however, there were lower concentrations (P < 0.001) and proportions (P < 0.001) of bifidobacteria in the intervention group compared with controls when adjusted for baseline. In the intention-to-treat analysis, more patients in the intervention group reported adequate control of symptoms (13/19, 68%) compared with controls (5/22, 23%; P = 0.005). This randomized controlled trial demonstrated a reduction in concentration and proportion of luminal bifidobacteria after 4 wk of fermentable carbohydrate restriction. Although the intervention was effective in managing IBS symptoms, the implications of its effect on the GI microbiota are still to be determined.
Language eng
DOI 10.3945/jn.112.159285
Field of Research 1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
0702 Animal Production
0908 Food Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, American Society for Nutrition
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30117857

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
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