The acute effect of oleic- or linoleic acid-containing meals on appetite and metabolic markers; a pilot study in overweight or obese individuals

Naughton, Shaan, Hanson, Erik D., Mathai, Michael L. and McAinch, Andrew J. 2018, The acute effect of oleic- or linoleic acid-containing meals on appetite and metabolic markers; a pilot study in overweight or obese individuals, Nutrients, vol. 10, no. 10, doi: 10.3390/nu10101376.

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Title The acute effect of oleic- or linoleic acid-containing meals on appetite and metabolic markers; a pilot study in overweight or obese individuals
Author(s) Naughton, ShaanORCID iD for Naughton, Shaan orcid.org/0000-0003-0174-3933
Hanson, Erik D.
Mathai, Michael L.
McAinch, Andrew J.
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 10
Issue number 10
Article ID 1376
Total pages 17
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2018-09-26
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) appetite regulation
dietary fats
ghrelin
linoleic acid
oleic acid
satiety
Summary Despite the abundance of plant-derived fats in our diet, their effects on appetite, and metabolic markers, remain unclear. This single-blinded 3-way cross-over pilot study aimed to investigate the ability of the two most abundant dietary plant-derived fats, oleic (OA) and linoleic (LA) acids, to modulate postprandial appetite and levels of circulating appetite and metabolic regulators in overweight/obese individuals. Meals were a high-carbohydrate control, a high-OA or a high-LA meal, and provided 30% of participants' estimated energy requirements. Meals were consumed after an overnight fast, with blood samples collected over 3¼ h. Appetite parameters were assessed via a validated visual analogue scale questionnaire. Hormones and other circulating factors were quantified using multiplex immunoassays. Eight participants (age 45.8 ± 3.6 (years), body mass index 32.0 ± 1.3 (kg/m²)) completed the study. All meals significantly increased fullness and reduced desire to eat. The control and high-OA meals significantly decreased prospective food intake. The high-LA meal increased ghrelin levels (p < 0.05), a hormone which encourages food intake. This was coupled with a significant acute increase in resistin levels, which impairs insulin signaling. Taken together, this study indicates that in overweight/obese individuals, high-LA meals may promote excess energy intake and alter glucose handling, though a larger cohort may be required to strengthen results.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu10101376
Field of Research 1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30118496

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