Moderation of associations between maternal parenting styles and Australian pre-school children's dietary intake by family structure and mother's employment status

Burnett, Alissa Jane, Worsley, Anthony, Lacy, Kathleen and Lamb, Karen 2019, Moderation of associations between maternal parenting styles and Australian pre-school children's dietary intake by family structure and mother's employment status, Public health nutrition, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.1017/S1368980018003671.

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Title Moderation of associations between maternal parenting styles and Australian pre-school children's dietary intake by family structure and mother's employment status
Author(s) Burnett, Alissa Jane
Worsley, AnthonyORCID iD for Worsley, Anthony orcid.org/0000-0002-4635-6059
Lacy, KathleenORCID iD for Lacy, Kathleen orcid.org/0000-0002-2982-4455
Lamb, KarenORCID iD for Lamb, Karen orcid.org/0000-0001-9782-8450
Journal name Public health nutrition
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2019-01-22
ISSN 1368-9800
1475-2727
Keyword(s) Diet
Longitudinal Study of Australian Children
Parenting styles
Pre-school children
Summary OBJECTIVE: To examine associations between maternal parenting style and pre-school children's dietary intake and to test whether perceived maternal time pressures, parenting arrangements and employment status influence these relationships. DESIGN: This cross-sectional study examined mothers' reports of their child's frequency of consumption of eight food and drink groups, including sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), unhealthy snacks, takeaway foods, fruit and vegetables. Parenting styles were classified as authoritative, authoritarian, permissive or disengaged using two parenting dimensions (warmth and control). The moderating roles of parenting arrangements, indexed by number of parents in the home and maternal employment status, were assessed. Associations were examined using multinomial regression. SETTING: Data were from the infant and child cohorts in the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children.ParticipantsChildren aged 4-5 years from both cohorts (infant: n 3607; child: n 4661) were included. RESULTS: Compared with children of disengaged mothers, children of authoritative mothers consumed most unhealthy foods less frequently, and fruit and vegetables more frequently. Results suggested parenting arrangements and mothers' working status may moderate associations between parenting styles and SSB, takeaway foods, takeaway snacks and fruit consumption. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that authoritative parenting style is associated with a higher consumption of fruit and vegetables and a lower consumption of unhealthy foods among children. However, parenting arrangements and the mothers' working status may influence these relationships. Further research is required to examine the influence of other potential moderators of parenting style/food consumption relationships such as household time and resource limitations.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S1368980018003671
Field of Research 11 Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30118502

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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