Increasing the functionalities of 3D printed microchemical devices by single material, multimaterial, and print-pause-print 3D printing

Li, Feng, Macdonald, Niall P., Guijt, Rosanne and Breadmore, Michael C. 2018, Increasing the functionalities of 3D printed microchemical devices by single material, multimaterial, and print-pause-print 3D printing, Lab on a chip, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 35-49, doi: 10.1039/c8lc00826d.

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Title Increasing the functionalities of 3D printed microchemical devices by single material, multimaterial, and print-pause-print 3D printing
Author(s) Li, Feng
Macdonald, Niall P.
Guijt, RosanneORCID iD for Guijt, Rosanne orcid.org/0000-0003-0011-5708
Breadmore, Michael C.
Journal name Lab on a chip
Volume number 19
Issue number 1
Start page 35
End page 49
Total pages 15
Publisher Royal Society of Chemistry
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2018-12-18
ISSN 1473-0197
1473-0189
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Physical Sciences
Biochemical Research Methods
Chemistry, Multidisciplinary
Chemistry, Analytical
Nanoscience & Nanotechnology
Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
Chemistry
Science & Technology - Other Topics
CHEMICAL-ANALYSIS SYSTEMS
MICROFLUIDIC DEVICES
DNA AMPLIFICATION
REACTIONWARE
FABRICATION
SEPARATION
ELECTRODES
MEMBRANES
ELEMENTS
ENABLES
Summary 3D printing has emerged as a valuable approach for the fabrication of fluidic devices and may replace soft-lithography as the method of choice for rapid prototyping. The potential of this disruptive technology is much greater than this - it allows for functional integration in a single, highly automated manufacturing step in a cost and time effective manner. Integration of functionality with a 3D printer can be done through spatial configuration of a single material, inserting pre-made components mid-print in a print-pause-print approach, and/or through the precise spatial deposition of different materials with a multimaterial printer. This review provides an overview on the ways in which 3D printing has been exploited to create and use fluidic devices with different functionality, which provides a basis for critical reflection on the current deficiencies and future opportunities for integration by 3D printing.
Language eng
DOI 10.1039/c8lc00826d
Field of Research 03 Chemical Sciences
09 Engineering
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, The Royal Society of Chemistry
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30118647

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Faculty of Science, Engineering and Built Environment
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