Computerised memory specificity training (c-MeST) for the treatment of major depression: a study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

Hallford, David J, Austin, David W, Raes, Filip and Takano, Keisuke 2019, Computerised memory specificity training (c-MeST) for the treatment of major depression: a study protocol for a randomised controlled trial, BMJ open, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 1-6, doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-024508.

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Title Computerised memory specificity training (c-MeST) for the treatment of major depression: a study protocol for a randomised controlled trial
Author(s) Hallford, David JORCID iD for Hallford, David J orcid.org/0000-0003-1093-8345
Austin, David WORCID iD for Austin, David W orcid.org/0000-0002-1296-3555
Raes, Filip
Takano, Keisuke
Journal name BMJ open
Volume number 9
Issue number 2
Article ID e024508
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2019-02-27
ISSN 2044-6055
Keyword(s) autobiographical memory specificity
depression
memory specificity training
study protocol
Summary INTRODUCTION: Major depression is a prevalent and debilitating disorder, but many sufferers do not receive support or respond to current treatments. The development of easily accessible and low-intensity treatments that have clear cognitive mechanisms of change is indicated. Memory specificity training (MeST) is an intervention for depression that targets deficits in recalling detailed memories of past experiences through repeated practice of autobiographical memory retrieval. This randomised controlled trial will assess the efficacy of an online, computerised version of MeST (c-MeST). METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Adults aged 18 and over with a current major depressive episode (MDE) will be recruited and randomised to have access to the seven session, online c-MeST programme for 2 weeks, or to a wait-list control group. The primary outcomes will be diagnostic status of MDE and self-reported depressive symptoms at postintervention. One-month and three-month follow-ups will be collected. Increases in autobiographical memory specificity will be assessed as a mediator of change, as well as other variables thought to contribute to reduced memory specificity, such as rumination and cognitive avoidance. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics approval has been granted by the Deakin University Human Research Ethics Committee to conduct the study (ID: 2017_168). The findings will be disseminated through scholarly publications and workshops and will inform future trials, such as with an active comparator or as an adjunct treatment. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12618000257268; Pre-results.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-024508
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, Author(s) (or their employer(s))
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30119863

Document type: Journal Article
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