Health outcomes for Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children born preterm, low birthweight or small for gestational age: a nationwide cohort study

Westrupp, Elizabeth M, D'Esposito, Fabrizio, Freemantle, Jane, Mensah, Fiona K and Nicholson, Jan M 2019, Health outcomes for Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children born preterm, low birthweight or small for gestational age: a nationwide cohort study, PLoS one, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0212130.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Health outcomes for Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children born preterm, low birthweight or small for gestational age: a nationwide cohort study
Author(s) Westrupp, Elizabeth MORCID iD for Westrupp, Elizabeth M orcid.org/0000-0001-6517-6064
D'Esposito, Fabrizio
Freemantle, Jane
Mensah, Fiona K
Nicholson, Jan M
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 14
Issue number 2
Article ID e0212130
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2019-02-20
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children
Health outcomes
Perinatal risk
Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Summary OBJECTIVE: To examine health outcomes in Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children experiencing perinatal risk and identify protective factors in the antenatal period. METHODS: Baby/Child cohorts of the Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children, born 2001-2008, across four annual surveys (aged 0-8 years, N = 1483). Children with 'mild' and 'moderate-to-high' perinatal risk were compared to children born normal weight at term for maternal-rated global health and disability, and body-mass-index measured by the interviewer. RESULTS: Almost one third of children had experienced mild (22%) or moderate-to-high perinatal risk (8%). Perinatal risk was associated with lower body-mass-index z-scores (regression coefficients adjusted for pregnancy and environment factors: mild = -0.21, 95% CI = -0.34, -0.07; moderate-to-high = -0.42, 95% CI = -0.63, -0.21). Moderate-to-high perinatal risk was associated with poorer global health, with associations becoming less evident in models adjusted for pregnancy and environment factors; but not evident for disability. A range of protective factors, including cultural-based resilience and smoking cessation, were associated with lower risk of adverse outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Perinatal risks are associated with Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait children experiencing adverse health particularly lower body weight. Cultural-based resilience and smoking cessation may be two modifiable pathways to ameliorating health problems associated with perinatal risk.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0212130
Indigenous content on
Field of Research MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, Westrupp et al.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30119875

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Checking
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 73 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 14 Mar 2019, 11:48:40 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.