Integrating evidence into policy and sustainable disability services delivery in western New South Wales, Australia: the 'wobbly hub and double spokes' project

Veitch, Craig, Lincoln, Michelle, Bundy, Anita, Gallego, Gisselle, Dew, Angela, Bulkeley, Kim, Brentnall, Jennie and Griffiths, Scott 2012, Integrating evidence into policy and sustainable disability services delivery in western New South Wales, Australia: the 'wobbly hub and double spokes' project, BMC health services research, vol. 12, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1186/1472-6963-12-70.

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Title Integrating evidence into policy and sustainable disability services delivery in western New South Wales, Australia: the 'wobbly hub and double spokes' project
Author(s) Veitch, Craig
Lincoln, Michelle
Bundy, Anita
Gallego, Gisselle
Dew, AngelaORCID iD for Dew, Angela orcid.org/0000-0002-8800-5660
Bulkeley, Kim
Brentnall, Jennie
Griffiths, Scott
Journal name BMC health services research
Volume number 12
Article ID 70
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2012-03-21
ISSN 1472-6963
Keyword(s) Rural
Remote
Regional
Allied health
Disability
Workforce
Retention
Policy
Service provision
Access
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Health Care Sciences & Services
Summary BACKGROUND: Policy that supports rural allied health service delivery is important given the shortage of services outside of Australian metropolitan centres. The shortage of allied health professionals means that rural clinicians work long hours and have little peer or service support. Service delivery to rural and remote communities is further complicated because relatively small numbers of clients are dispersed over large geographic areas. The aim of this five-year multi-stage project is to generate evidence to confirm and develop evidence-based policies and to evaluate their implementation in procedures that allow a regional allied health workforce to more expeditiously respond to disability service need in regional New South Wales, Australia. METHODS/DESIGN: The project consists of four inter-related stages that together constitute a full policy cycle. It uses mixed quantitative and qualitative methods, guided by key policy concerns such as: access, complexity, cost, distribution of benefits, timeliness, effectiveness, equity, policy consistency, and community and political acceptability. Stage 1 adopts a policy analysis approach in which existing relevant policies and related documentation will be collected and reviewed. Policy-makers and senior managers within the region and in central offices will be interviewed about issues that influence policy development and implementation. Stage 2 uses a mixed methods approach to collecting information from allied health professionals, clients, and carers. Focus groups and interviews will explore issues related to providing and receiving allied health services. Discrete Choice Experiments will elicit staff and client/carer preferences. Stage 3 synthesises Stage 1 and 2 findings with reference to the key policy issues to develop and implement policies and procedures to establish several innovative regional workforce and service provision projects. Stage 4 uses mixed methods to monitor and evaluate the implementation and impact of new or adapted policies that arise from the preceding stages. DISCUSSION: The project will provide policy makers with research evidence to support consideration of the complex balance between: (i) the equitable allocation of scarce resources; (ii) the intent of current eligibility and prioritisation policies; (iii) workforce constraints (and strengths); and (iv) the most effective, evidence-based clinical practice.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-12-70
Field of Research 1117 Public Health and Health Services
0807 Library and Information Studies
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Veitch et al.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30120584

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