Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder: protocol for the adhesive capsulitis biomarker (AdCaB) study

Page, Richard, Mcgee, Sean, Eng, Kevin, Brown, Graeme, Beattie, Sally, Collier, Fiona and Gill, Stephen D. 2019, Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder: protocol for the adhesive capsulitis biomarker (AdCaB) study, BMC musculoskeletal disorders, vol. 20, no. 1, doi: 10.1186/s12891-019-2536-x.

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Title Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder: protocol for the adhesive capsulitis biomarker (AdCaB) study
Author(s) Page, RichardORCID iD for Page, Richard orcid.org/0000-0002-2225-7144
Mcgee, SeanORCID iD for Mcgee, Sean orcid.org/0000-0001-6953-106X
Eng, Kevin
Brown, Graeme
Beattie, Sally
Collier, Fiona
Gill, Stephen D.ORCID iD for Gill, Stephen D. orcid.org/0000-0001-8722-0572
Journal name BMC musculoskeletal disorders
Volume number 20
Issue number 1
Article ID 145
Total pages 6
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2019-04-05
ISSN 1471-2474
Keyword(s) Adhesive capsulitis
Biomarkers
Frozen shoulder
Transcriptomics
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Orthopedics
Rheumatology
ASSOCIATION
CYTOKINES
PATHOLOGY
Summary BACKGROUND: Adhesive capsulitis (AC) is a disabling and poorly understood pathological condition of the shoulder joint. The current study aims to increase our understanding of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and clinical outcomes of people with AC by investigating: 1) transcriptome-wide alterations in gene expression of the glenohumeral joint capsule in people with AC compared to people with non-inflammatory shoulder instability (controls); 2) serum and urine biomarkers to better understand diagnosis and staging of AC; and 3) clinical outcomes in people with AC compared to controls 12-months following arthroscopic capsular release or labral repair respectively. METHODS: The study is a prospective multi-centre longitudinal study investigating people undergoing arthroscopic capsulotomy for AC compared to people undergoing arthroscopic stabilization for shoulder instability. Tissue samples collected from the anterior glenohumeral joint capsule during surgery will undergo RNA-seq to determine differences in gene expression between the study groups. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis will be used to further understand the pathogenesis of AC as well as guide serum and urine biomarker analysis. Clinical outcomes regarding pain, function and quality of life will be assessed using the Oxford Shoulder Score, Oxford Shoulder Instability Score, Quick DASH, American Shoulder and Elbow Society Score, EQ-5D-5 L and active shoulder range of movement. Clinical outcomes will be collected pre-operatively and 12-months post-operatively and study groups will be compared for statistically significant differences using linear regression, adjusting for baseline demographic variables. DISCUSSION: This study will provide much needed information regarding the pathogenesis, diagnosis and staging of AC. It will evaluate clinical outcomes for people undergoing arthroscopic release of AC by comparing this group to people undergoing arthroscopic surgery for shoulder instability. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ACTRN12618000431224 , retrospectively registered 26 March 2018.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12891-019-2536-x
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30120723

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
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