Associations of class-time sitting, stepping and sit-to-stand transitions with cognitive functions and brain activity in children

Mazzoli, Emiliano, Teo, Wei-Peng, Salmon, Jo-Ann, Pesce, C, He, Jason, Ben-Soussan, TD and Barnett, Lisa 2019, Associations of class-time sitting, stepping and sit-to-stand transitions with cognitive functions and brain activity in children, International journal of environmental research and public health, vol. 16, no. 9, pp. 1-20, doi: 10.3390/ijerph16091482.

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Title Associations of class-time sitting, stepping and sit-to-stand transitions with cognitive functions and brain activity in children
Author(s) Mazzoli, EmilianoORCID iD for Mazzoli, Emiliano orcid.org/0000-0002-9207-4167
Teo, Wei-PengORCID iD for Teo, Wei-Peng orcid.org/0000-0003-3929-9778
Salmon, Jo-AnnORCID iD for Salmon, Jo-Ann orcid.org/0000-0002-4734-6354
Pesce, C
He, Jason
Ben-Soussan, TD
Barnett, LisaORCID iD for Barnett, Lisa orcid.org/0000-0002-9731-625X
Journal name International journal of environmental research and public health
Volume number 16
Issue number 9
Article ID 1482
Start page 1
End page 20
Total pages 20
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2019-04-26
ISSN 1661-7827
1660-4601
Keyword(s) attention
brain activity
children
class time
executive functions
school-based
sedentary behaviour
Summary Previous research showed that children's physical activity is positively related to executive functions, whilst screen time shows negative associations. However, it is unclear how school-based sitting time and transitions from sitting to standing relate to cognition. We investigated the relationship between class time sitting/stepping/sit-to-stand transitions and cognitive functions in Grade 1-2 children. Overall, 149 children (7.7 ± 0.6 years old, 54% boys) participated. Measures included class time sitting/stepping/sit-to-stand transitions and: (i) response inhibition (i.e., response time and accuracy); (ii) lapses of attention; (iii) working memory; and (iv) brain activity (cortical haemodynamic response). Linear mixed-models, adjusting for age, sex, and clustering at the classroom level, found that more sitting time was associated with higher lapses of attention (β = 0.12, p < 0.05). Children who stepped more had quicker inhibition response time (β = -0.95, p < 0.01); however, they were less accurate in their responses (β = -0.30, p < 0.05) and this was also observed with sit-to-stand transitions (β = -0.26, p < 0.05). No associations were found with brain activity. In conclusion, reducing and breaking up sitting may help keep children focused, but the evidence regarding response inhibition is unclear.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph16091482
Field of Research MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30121210

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