Digital public criminology in Australia and New Zealand: results from a mixed methods study of criminologists' use of social media

Wood, Mark, Richards, Imogen, Iliadis, Mary and McDermott, Michael 2019, Digital public criminology in Australia and New Zealand: results from a mixed methods study of criminologists' use of social media, International journal for crime, justice and social democracy.

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Title Digital public criminology in Australia and New Zealand: results from a mixed methods study of criminologists' use of social media
Author(s) Wood, Mark
Richards, ImogenORCID iD for Richards, Imogen orcid.org/0000-0001-6317-5631
Iliadis, MaryORCID iD for Iliadis, Mary orcid.org/0000-0002-8274-4112
McDermott, Michael
Journal name International journal for crime, justice and social democracy
Publisher Queensland University of Technology
Place of publication Brisbane, Qld
Publication date 2019-06-03
ISSN 2202-7998
Keyword(s) public engagement
public criminology
social media
digital criminology
Summary The proliferation of social media in the so-called ‘post-broadcast era’ has profoundly altered the terrain for researchers to produce public scholarship and engage with the public. To date, however, the impact of social media on public criminology has not been subject to empirical inquiry. Drawing from a dataset of 116 survey responses and nine interviews, our mixed methods study addresses this opening by examining how criminologists in Australia and New Zealand have employed social media to engage in newsmaking and public criminology. This article presents findings from survey questions that assess the practices and perceptions of criminologists in relation to social media, and insights from an analysis that explores the political, ethical, and logistical issues raised by respondents. These issues include the democratising potential of social media in criminological research, and its ability to provide representation for historically marginalised populations. Questions pertaining to ‘newsmaking criminology’ and the wider performance of ‘public criminology’ are also addressed.
Notes This article has been accepted and is forthcoming
Language eng
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 160204 Criminological Theories
190205 Interactive Media
200102 Communication Technology and Digital Media Studies
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30121405

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Arts and Education
School of Humanities and Social Sciences
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