Key messages in an early childhood obesity prevention intervention: are they recalled and do they impact children's behaviour?

Ray, Carola, Campbell, Karen and Hesketh, Kylie D. 2019, Key messages in an early childhood obesity prevention intervention: are they recalled and do they impact children's behaviour?, International journal of environmental research and public health, vol. 16, no. 9, doi: 10.3390/ijerph16091550.

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Title Key messages in an early childhood obesity prevention intervention: are they recalled and do they impact children's behaviour?
Author(s) Ray, Carola
Campbell, KarenORCID iD for Campbell, Karen orcid.org/0000-0002-4499-3396
Hesketh, Kylie D.ORCID iD for Hesketh, Kylie D. orcid.org/0000-0002-2702-7110
Journal name International journal of environmental research and public health
Volume number 16
Issue number 9
Total pages 11
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2019-05-02
ISSN 1661-7827
1660-4601
Keyword(s) early childhood
follow-up
food intake
health behaviours
health messages
intervention
obesity prevention
physical activity
screen time
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Environmental Sciences
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
MOTHERS PERCEPTIONS
SEDENTARY BEHAVIORS
FEEDING PRACTICES
HEALTH
PARENTS
VALIDITY
Summary Knowledge of the impact of health messages as an intervention strategy is sparse. The aim of this study was to explore recall and use of health behaviour messages among mothers, and whether recall is associated with child health behaviours. Intervention group data from the 15 months Melbourne Infant Feeding, Activity and Nutrition Trial (InFANT) were used (n = 127, children 4 months at commencement). Mothers recalled (unprompted then prompted) at 2 and 3.5 years post-intervention six key messages used in the program, and reported whether they had used them. Children's food intake was measured by three days of 24-h recall; physical activity by accelerometers; and television viewing by parent report. Unprompted recall ranged between 1-56% across messages and follow-up points, and 37-90% for prompted recall. The most commonly recalled messages "tap into water", "parents provide, kids decide" and "color every meal with fruit and veg" were also most commonly used. There were few associations between recall and children's health behaviours. Given the association between recall and reported use, it is important to plan messages so they resonate well with the target group and its needs. Messages should be used as one of multiple strategies within health promotion programs.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph16091550
Field of Research MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Grant ID NHMRC 425801
NHMRC 1008879
Copyright notice ©2019, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30121714

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