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Plant desiccation tolerance and its regulation in the foliage of resurrection “flowering-plant” species

Blomstedt, Cecilia K, Griffiths, Cara A, Gaff, Donald F, Hamill, John D and Neale, Alan D 2018, Plant desiccation tolerance and its regulation in the foliage of resurrection “flowering-plant” species, Agronomy, vol. 8, no. 8, pp. 1-33, doi: 10.3390/agronomy8080146.

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Title Plant desiccation tolerance and its regulation in the foliage of resurrection “flowering-plant” species
Author(s) Blomstedt, Cecilia K
Griffiths, Cara A
Gaff, Donald F
Hamill, John D
Neale, Alan D
Journal name Agronomy
Volume number 8
Issue number 8
Article ID 146
Start page 1
End page 33
Total pages 33
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2018-08
ISSN 2073-4395
2073-4395
Keyword(s) abscisic acid (ABA)
acetate
CLAVATA3/Embryo-surrounding region-related 25 (CLE25) peptide
desiccation-tolerant foliage
gene expression
phytohormones
protein complement
resurrection grass
Sporobolus stapfianus
strigolactone
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Agronomy
Plant Sciences
Agriculture
CLAVATA3
Embryo-surrounding region-related 25 (CLE25) peptide
Summary The majority of flowering-plant species can survive complete air-dryness in their seed and/or pollen. Relatively few species (‘resurrection plants’) express this desiccation tolerance in their foliage. Knowledge of the regulation of desiccation tolerance in resurrection plant foliage is reviewed. Elucidation of the regulatory mechanism in resurrection grasses may lead to identification of genes that can improve stress tolerance and yield of major crop species. Well-hydrated leaves of resurrection plants are desiccation-sensitive and the leaves become desiccation tolerant as they are drying. Such drought-induction of desiccation tolerance involves changes in gene-expression causing extensive changes in the complement of proteins and the transition to a highly-stable quiescent state lasting months to years. These changes in gene-expression are regulated by several interacting phytohormones, of which drought-induced abscisic acid (ABA) is particularly important in some species. Treatment with only ABA induces desiccation tolerance in vegetative tissue of Borya constricta Churchill. and Craterostigma plantagineum Hochstetter. but not in the resurrection grass Sporobolus stapfianus Gandoger. Suppression of drought-induced senescence is also important for survival of drying. Further research is needed on the triggering of the induction of desiccation tolerance, on the transition between phases of protein synthesis and on the role of the phytohormone, strigolactone and other potential xylem-messengers during drying and rehydration.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/agronomy8080146
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, the authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30121973

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.