Openly accessible

An investigation of the effects of stage of ensilage on Nassella neesiana seeds, for reducing seed viability and injury to livestock

Weller, S. L., Florentine, S. K., Sillitoe, J. F., Grech, C. J. and McLaren, D. A. 2016, An investigation of the effects of stage of ensilage on Nassella neesiana seeds, for reducing seed viability and injury to livestock, Scientific reports, vol. 6, doi: 10.1038/srep22345.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
sillitoe-investigationofthe-2019.pdf Published version application/pdf 543.24KB 24

Title An investigation of the effects of stage of ensilage on Nassella neesiana seeds, for reducing seed viability and injury to livestock
Author(s) Weller, S. L.
Florentine, S. K.
Sillitoe, J. F.
Grech, C. J.
McLaren, D. A.
Journal name Scientific reports
Volume number 6
Article ID 22345
Total pages 7
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 2045-2322
2045-2322
Summary The noxious weed Nassella neesiana is established on a wide range of productive land throughout southeastern Australia. N. neesiana seeds, when mature, are sharp, causing injury to livestock, thus posing a problem in fodder bales. To reduce infestations of agricultural weeds in situ, production of silage from weed-infested pastures is practised as part of integrated weed management (IWM). However, there is little data to demonstrate whether this process is useful to reduce infestations or the harmful properties of N. neesiana. Therefore, the minimum duration of ensilage required to reduce the viability of N. neesiana seeds was investigated, both with and without addition of ensilage inoculants in this process. Also, the decreasing propensity of the seeds to injure livestock, after various times and conditions of ensilage, was assessed. Ensilage inoculant reduced seed germination probability to zero after 35 days. When no inoculant was added, zero viability was achieved after 42 days. A qualitative assessment of the hardness of ensilaged seeds found seed husks were softer (and therefore safer) after 42 days, whether inoculant was used or not. Therefore, we suggest that both the viability of N. neesiana seeds and hardness of seed casings are significantly reduced after 42 days, thereby reducing the risks of seed dispersal and injury to livestock.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/srep22345
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30122151

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 48 Abstract Views, 25 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 29 May 2019, 13:41:05 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.