Can gut microbiota composition predict response to dietary treatments?

Biesiekierski, Jessica R, Jalanka, Jonna and Staudacher, Heidi M 2019, Can gut microbiota composition predict response to dietary treatments?, Nutrients, vol. 11, no. 5, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.3390/nu11051134.

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Title Can gut microbiota composition predict response to dietary treatments?
Author(s) Biesiekierski, Jessica R
Jalanka, Jonna
Staudacher, Heidi MORCID iD for Staudacher, Heidi M orcid.org/0000-0001-6704-2131
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 11
Issue number 5
Article ID 1134
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2019-05
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) personalised nutrition
microbiota
dietary intervention
obesity
irritable bowel syndrome
gastrointestinal symptoms
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
Summary Dietary intervention is a challenge in clinical practice because of inter-individual variability in clinical response. Gut microbiota is mechanistically relevant for a number of disease states and consequently has been incorporated as a key variable in personalised nutrition models within the research context. This paper aims to review the evidence related to the predictive capacity of baseline microbiota for clinical response to dietary intervention in two specific health conditions, namely, obesity and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Clinical trials and larger predictive modelling studies were identified and critically evaluated. The findings reveal inconsistent evidence to support baseline microbiota as an accurate predictor of weight loss or glycaemic response in obesity, or as a predictor of symptom improvement in irritable bowel syndrome, in dietary intervention trials. Despite advancement in quantification methodologies, research in this area remains challenging and larger scale studies are needed until personalised nutrition is realistically achievable and can be translated to clinical practice.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu11051134
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, the authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30122865

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
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