The relationship between an electronic mental health stigma campaign and suicidal thoughts and behaviours: a two-arm randomized controlled trial in the Australian construction industry

Milner, A, Aitken, Z, Law, PCF, LaMontagne, Anthony D, Mann, C, Cooper, T and Witt, K 2019, The relationship between an electronic mental health stigma campaign and suicidal thoughts and behaviours: a two-arm randomized controlled trial in the Australian construction industry, Health promotion international, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1093/heapro/daz034.

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Title The relationship between an electronic mental health stigma campaign and suicidal thoughts and behaviours: a two-arm randomized controlled trial in the Australian construction industry
Author(s) Milner, AORCID iD for Milner, A orcid.org/0000-0003-4657-0503
Aitken, Z
Law, PCF
LaMontagne, Anthony DORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony D orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Mann, C
Cooper, T
Witt, K
Journal name Health promotion international
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2019-05-12
ISSN 0957-4824
1460-2245
Keyword(s) Stigma
Suicide
Construction
Suicide attempt
Self-harm
Thoughts about suicide
Suicide ideation
Summary Males employed in the construction industry are at greater risk of suicide than other employed males. It is plausible that a high level of stigma against mental health problems explains the elevated rates of suicide among this group. This study sought to test the effectiveness of an electronic mental health stigma intervention on suicide ideation, communication about suicide and attempts. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either a series of brief contact interventions over a 6-week period or a wait list control. Suicidal ideation, communication about suicide and suicide attempts were assessed using the Suicidal Behaviors Questionnaire-Revised at post-intervention. We used linear regression to assess effectiveness at post-intervention, adjusting for relevant covariates using both conventional methods and a propensity score approach. Results indicate that the intervention had no significant impact on suicidal thoughts, communication or suicide attempts. There was some indication that individuals in the intervention group reported a slight increase in attempts and communication about suicide. These observations underscore an urgent need for more research to understand the complex and nuanced relationship between stigma and suicide in non-clinical populations.
Notes In press
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/heapro/daz034
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 111705 Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety
111714 Mental Health
1117 Public Health and Health Services
1302 Curriculum and Pedagogy
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, The Author(s)
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30122897

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Health and Social Development
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