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Inappropriate behaviours experienced by doctors while undertaking specialty training

Abhary, Sotoodeh, Botti, Mari, Dhulia, Anjali, Loh, Erwin and Catford, John 2018, Inappropriate behaviours experienced by doctors while undertaking specialty training, BMJ leader, vol. 2, no. 4, pp. 140-143, doi: 10.1136/leader-2018-000090.

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Title Inappropriate behaviours experienced by doctors while undertaking specialty training
Author(s) Abhary, Sotoodeh
Botti, MariORCID iD for Botti, Mari orcid.org/0000-0002-2782-0987
Dhulia, Anjali
Loh, Erwin
Catford, John
Journal name BMJ leader
Volume number 2
Issue number 4
Start page 140
End page 143
Total pages 4
Publisher BMJ
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2018-12
ISSN 2398-631X
Summary Purpose To explore inappropriate behaviours experienced during specialty training in Australia and their implications for doctors' training experiences and outcomes. This is a subset of data from a larger study exploring experiences of doctors in Australian specialty training - a qualitative study of enablers, stressors and supports. Methods In this qualitative study, registrars in specialist training programmes in Australia were invited and interviewed between August 2015 and August 2016. Semistructured open-ended questions were used to explore topics of relevance to their workplace, training, support service use and personal lives. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, de-identified and content and thematic analysis undertaken. Recruitment was ceased when data saturation was reached and no new themes emerged. Key themes related to inappropriate behaviours experienced during specialty training are reported in this study. Results 17 participants were recruited (including one Indigenous and one international medical graduate). A total of six specialty training programmes across multiple states at various locations across Australia were represented in this cohort. Almost all participants reported confronting (personally experienced or witnessed) inappropriate behaviours during their training, perpetrated most commonly by senior doctors. Key themes of inappropriate behaviour that emerged were belittling and humiliation, sexually inappropriate behaviour, inappropriate behaviour as part of the 'culture' of medicine, reluctance to raise concerns due to fear of recrimination, and impacts of inappropriate behaviour. Conclusion Varying inappropriate behaviours were experienced by doctors in specialty training, having implications for their psychological well-being. A multidimensional and multisystem approach is required in the management of this serious issue.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/leader-2018-000090
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30122901

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.