Development of temperamental effortful control mediates the relationship between maturation of the prefrontal cortex and psychopathology during adolescence: a 4-year longitudinal study

Vijayakumar, Nandita, Whittle, Sarah, Dennison, Meg, Yücel, Murat, Simmons, Julian and Allen, Nicholas B. 2014, Development of temperamental effortful control mediates the relationship between maturation of the prefrontal cortex and psychopathology during adolescence: a 4-year longitudinal study, Developmental cognitive neuroscience, vol. 9, pp. 30-43, doi: 10.1016/j.dcn.2013.12.002.

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Title Development of temperamental effortful control mediates the relationship between maturation of the prefrontal cortex and psychopathology during adolescence: a 4-year longitudinal study
Author(s) Vijayakumar, NanditaORCID iD for Vijayakumar, Nandita orcid.org/0000-0002-5622-9547
Whittle, Sarah
Dennison, Meg
Yücel, Murat
Simmons, Julian
Allen, Nicholas B.
Journal name Developmental cognitive neuroscience
Volume number 9
Start page 30
End page 43
Total pages 14
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2014-07
ISSN 1878-9293
1878-9307
Keyword(s) Social Sciences
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Psychology, Developmental
Neurosciences
Psychology
Neurosciences & Neurology
Self-regulation
Effortful control
Cortical development
Adolescence
Longitudinal study
HUMAN CEREBRAL-CORTEX
COGNITIVE EMOTION REGULATION
CORTICAL THICKNESS
DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS
SEX-DIFFERENCES
EXTERNALIZING PROBLEMS
PSYCHIATRIC-DISORDERS
BRAIN MATURATION
PITUITARY VOLUME
Summary This study investigated the relationship between the development of effortful control (EC), a temperamental measure of self-regulation, and concurrent development of three regions of the prefrontal cortex (anterior cingulate cortex, ACC; dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dlPFC; ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, vlPFC) between early- and mid-adolescence. It also examined whether development of EC mediated the relationship between cortical maturation and emotional and behavioral symptoms. Ninety-two adolescents underwent baseline assessments when they were approximately 12 years old and follow-up assessments approximately 4 years later. At each assessment, participants had MRI scans and completed the Early Adolescent Temperament Questionnaire-Revised, as well as measures of depressive and anxious symptoms, and aggressive and risk taking behavior. Cortical thicknesses of the ACC, dlPFC and vlPFC, estimated using the FreeSurfer software, were found to decrease over time. EC also decreased over time in females. Greater thinning of the left ACC was associated with less reduction in EC. Furthermore, change in effortful control mediated the relationship between greater thinning of the left ACC and improvements in socioemotional functioning, including reductions in psychopathological symptoms. These findings highlight the dynamic association between EC and the maturation of the anterior cingulate cortex, and the importance of this relationship for socioemotional functioning during adolescence. © 2013 The Authors.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.dcn.2013.12.002
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30123629

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
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