The effect of a high-dose vitamin b multivitamin supplement on the relationship between brain metabolism and blood biomarkers of oxidative stress: a randomized control trial

Ford, Talitha, Downey, Luke A., Simpson, Tamara, McPhee, Grace, Oliver, Chris and Stough, Con 2018, The effect of a high-dose vitamin b multivitamin supplement on the relationship between brain metabolism and blood biomarkers of oxidative stress: a randomized control trial, Nutrients, vol. 10, no. 12, doi: 10.3390/nu10121860.

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Title The effect of a high-dose vitamin b multivitamin supplement on the relationship between brain metabolism and blood biomarkers of oxidative stress: a randomized control trial
Author(s) Ford, TalithaORCID iD for Ford, Talitha orcid.org/0000-0001-5400-2659
Downey, Luke A.
Simpson, Tamara
McPhee, Grace
Oliver, Chris
Stough, Con
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 10
Issue number 12
Total pages 13
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2018-12
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
B vitamins
multivitamin
1H-MRS
homocysteine
oxidative stress
posterior cingulate cortex
NAA
creatine
MAGNETIC-RESONANCE-SPECTROSCOPY
DOUBLE-BLIND
COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE
PLASMA HOMOCYSTEINE
MOOD
DISEASE
FOLATE
ADULTS
ACID
Summary © 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. A diet rich in B-group vitamins is essential for optimal body and brain function, and insufficient amounts of such vitamins have been associated with higher levels of neural inflammation and oxidative stress, as marked by increased blood plasma homocysteine. Neural biomarkers of oxidative stress quantified through proton magnetic spectroscopy (1H-MRS) are not well understood, and the relationship between such neural and blood biomarkers is seldom studied. The current study addresses this gap by investigating the direct effect of 6-month high-dose B-group vitamin supplementation on neural and blood biomarkers of metabolism. Using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, 32 healthy adults (20 female, 12 male) aged 30–65 years underwent blood tests (vitamin B6, vitamin B12, folate, and homocysteine levels) and 1H-MRS of the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) before and after supplementation. Results confirmed the supplement was effective in increasing vitamin B6 and vitamin B12 levels and reducing homocysteine, whereas there was no change in folate levels. There were significant relationships between vitamin B6 and N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline, and creatine, as well as between vitamin B12 and creatine (ps < 0.05), whereas NAA in the PCC increased, albeit not significantly (p > 0.05). Together these data provide preliminary evidence for the efficacy of high-dose B-group supplementation in reducing oxidative stress and inflammation through increasing oxidative metabolism. It may also promote myelination, cellular metabolism, and energy storage.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu10121860
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30123661

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
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