Perceptions of appropriate treatment among the informal allopathic providers: insights from a qualitative study in two peri-urban areas in Bangladesh

Sizear, M Monaemul Islam, Nababan, Herfina Y, Siddique, Md. Kaoser Bin, Islam, Shariful, Paul, Sukanta, Paul, Anup Kumar and Ahmed, Syed Masud 2019, Perceptions of appropriate treatment among the informal allopathic providers: insights from a qualitative study in two peri-urban areas in Bangladesh, BMC health services research, vol. 19, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1186/s12913-019-4254-3.

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Title Perceptions of appropriate treatment among the informal allopathic providers: insights from a qualitative study in two peri-urban areas in Bangladesh
Author(s) Sizear, M Monaemul Islam
Nababan, Herfina Y
Siddique, Md. Kaoser Bin
Islam, SharifulORCID iD for Islam, Shariful orcid.org/0000-0001-7926-9368
Paul, Sukanta
Paul, Anup Kumar
Ahmed, Syed Masud
Journal name BMC health services research
Volume number 19
Article ID 424
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2019
ISSN 1472-6963
Keyword(s) Informal providers
Private sector for health
Health service delivery
Appropriate treatment
Patient safety
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Health Care Sciences & Services
Summary BACKGROUND: How the informal providers deliver health services are not well understood in Bangladesh. However, their practices are often considered inappropriate and unsafe. This study attempted to fill-in this knowledge gap by exploring their perceptions about diagnosis and appropriate treatment, as well as identifying existing barriers to provide appropriate treatment. METHODS: This exploratory study was conducted in two peri-urban areas of metropolitan Dhaka. Study participants were selected purposively, and an interview guideline was used to collect in-depth data from thirteen providers. Content analysis was applied through data immersion and themes identification, including coding and sub-coding, as well as data display matrix creation to draw conclusion. RESULTS: The providers relied mainly on the history and presenting symptoms for diagnosis. Information and guidelines provided by the pharmaceutical representatives were important aids in their diagnosis and treatment decision making. Lack of training, diagnostic tools and medicine, along with consumer demands for certain medicine i.e. antibiotics, were cited as barriers to deliver appropriate care. Effective and supportive supervision, training, patient education, and availability of diagnostics and guidelines in Bangla were considered necessary in overcoming these barriers. CONCLUSION: Informal providers lack the knowledge and skills for delivering appropriate treatment and care. As they provide health services for substantial proportion of the population, it's crucial that policy makers become cognizant of the fact and take measures to remedy them. This is even more urgent if government's goal to reach universal health coverage by 2030 is to be achieved.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12913-019-4254-3
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1117 Public Health and Health Services
0807 Library and Information Studies
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, The Author(s)
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30123821

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