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The inner workings of the outer surface: skin and gill microbiota as indicators of changing gut health in Yellowtail Kingfish

Legrand, Thibault P. R. A., Catalano, Sarah R., Wos-Oxley, Melissa L., Stephens, Fran, Landos, Matt, Bansemer, Matthew S., Stone, David A. J., Qin, Jian G. and Oxley, Andrew 2018, The inner workings of the outer surface: skin and gill microbiota as indicators of changing gut health in Yellowtail Kingfish, Frontiers in microbiology, vol. 8, doi: 10.3389/fmicb.2017.02664.

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Title The inner workings of the outer surface: skin and gill microbiota as indicators of changing gut health in Yellowtail Kingfish
Author(s) Legrand, Thibault P. R. A.
Catalano, Sarah R.
Wos-Oxley, Melissa L.
Stephens, Fran
Landos, Matt
Bansemer, Matthew S.
Stone, David A. J.
Qin, Jian G.
Oxley, AndrewORCID iD for Oxley, Andrew orcid.org/0000-0002-6056-7602
Journal name Frontiers in microbiology
Volume number 8
Article ID 2664
Total pages 17
Publisher Frontiers
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2018-01-15
ISSN 1664-302X
Summary © 2018 Legrand, Catalano, Wos-Oxley, Stephens, Landos, Bansemer, Stone, Qin and Oxley. The mucosal surfaces and associated microbiota of fish are an important primary barrier and provide the first line of defense against potential pathogens. An understanding of the skin and gill microbial assemblages and the factors which drive their composition may provide useful insights into the broad dynamics of fish host-microbial relationships, and may reveal underlying changes in health status. This is particularly pertinent to cultivated systems whereby various stressors may led to conditions (like enteritis) which impinge on productivity. As an economically important species, we assessed whether the outer-surface bacterial communities reflect a change in gut health status of cultivated Yellowtail Kingfish (Seriola lalandi). Active bacterial assemblages were surveyed from RNA extracts from swabs of the skin and gills by constructing Illumina 16S rRNA gene amplicon libraries. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were predominant in both the skin and gills, with enrichment of key ß-proteobacteria in the gills (Nitrosomonadales and Ferrovales). Fish exhibiting early stage chronic lymphocytic enteritis comprised markedly different global bacterial assemblages compared to those deemed healthy and exhibiting late stages of the disease. This corresponded to an overall loss of diversity and enrichment of Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria, particularly in the gills. In contrast, bacterial assemblages of fish with late stage enteritis were generally similar to those of healthy individuals, though with some distinct taxa. In conclusion, gut health status is an important factor which defines the skin and gill bacterial assemblages of fish and likely reflects changes in immune states and barrier systems during the early onset of conditions like enteritis. This study represents the first to investigate the microbiota of the outer mucosal surfaces of fish in response to underlying chronic gut enteritis, revealing potential biomarkers for assessing fish health in commercial aquaculture systems.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fmicb.2017.02664
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2018, Legrand, Catalano, Wos-Oxley, Stephens, Landos, Bansemer, Stone, Qin and Oxley.
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30124161

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.